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Gravdigr 12-11-2014 05:00 PM

Awesome People
 
1 Attachment(s)
We have all kinds of 'people' threads, but, not one for awesome people. Well, now we do.

To start the thread off right, I'd like you to meet Cameron Lyle, if you haven't heard of him before.

Attachment 49815

He is an Awesome People™.

Quote:

Cameron Lyle, a Division I college athlete in New Hampshire, has decided to shorten his athletic career for a chance to save a life.

The University of New Hampshire senior will donate bone marrow Wednesday, a decision that abruptly ends his collegiate athletic career but one that he calls a "no brainer."

Lyle, 21, had his mouth swabbed to join a bone marrow registry two years ago in the cafeteria at school. He didn't think any more of it until a few months ago when he got a phone call that he might be a match. He took more tests and discovered a month later that he was a perfect match.

"When they first told me, I was like, 'OK, cool. I'm definitely going to do it,'" Lyle said. "After that I kind of went to tell my coach and then I realized slowly that my season was over."

Lyle's main events are the shot put and the hammer throw.

"It's just a sport," he said. "Just because it's Division I college level doesn't make it any more important. Life is a lot more important than that, so it was pretty easy."

Lyle competed in his last competition Saturday and said it was "kind of emotional." His teammates rallied around him to cheer him on.

The person who needs his help is a young man with leukemia. Lyle was told that the man only has six months to live without the transplant.

Lyle of Plaistow, N.H., said he had been told there was a one in five million chance for a non-family match.

"It was kind of a no-brainer for a decent human," Lyle said. "I couldn't imagine just waiting. He could have been waiting for years for a match. I'd hope that someone would donate to me if I needed it."

After he got the call, Lyle knew he needed to speak to his mom and his coach.

"My son and I have a pretty funny rapport together so when he tells me things, it's usually in humor," mom Chris Sciacca said. "He simply sent me a text that said, 'So I guess I have a chance to save someone's life.'"

The two sat down and talked through the decision, but Sciacca said it was ultimately a decision that "came from his heart."

"We talked about in five or 10 years, is he going to look back and say, 'Damn, I wish I went to that track conference,' or is he going to say, 'Damn, I saved someone's life," she said.

"I know my son very well and I know where his heart is and I knew that he would make the right decision.

"He made his decision. He gave up his college season to do this. He's a gentle giant," Sciacca said of her 6-foot-2-inch, 255-pound son. "He'll do anything for anybody."

What Lyle was most nervous about was telling Coach Jim Boulanger, who has been his coach for four years.

Boulanger said that a nervous Lyle came into his office, shut the door and told him he wouldn't be able to throw next month at the America East Conference championship for which he had been training.

When Boulanger asked why, Lyle told him and found that his coach was completely supportive.

"Here's the deal," Boulanger told Lyle. "You go to the conference and take 12 throws or you could give a man three or four more years of life. I don't think there's a big question here. This is not a moral dilemma. There's only one answer."

Boulanger said he's "very proud" of his athlete.

"He's very approachable. He's very funny," Boulanger said. "I don't have any doubt that he's very compassionate and it was just a given that he'd do it.

"You can't ask for any more out of a person than to help another person," he said.

Lyle's mother is just as proud.

"I am beyond words proud. He is my hero," Sciacca said. "When your children inspire you to be better people, you know it's come full circle and he's inspired his mom to be a better circle."

Lyle will make the bone marrow donation soon at Boston's Massachusetts General Hospital. A needle will be used to withdraw liquid bone marrow from his pelvic bone. After the surgery, he will not be allowed to lift more than 20 pounds over his head, which rules out all his athletic events.

Lyle and the man have to remain anonymous to each other for at least a year, but can then sign consent forms to release their identities if they want.

"I really want to meet him," Lyle said, "and I hope he wants to meet me."
~from ABCNews, April 23, 2013

Gravdigr 12-11-2014 05:06 PM

1 in 5,000,000...

lumberjim 12-11-2014 05:29 PM

I hope he plays the lottery and wins. BIG

classicman 12-11-2014 05:50 PM

Awesome

xoxoxoBruce 12-11-2014 06:39 PM

Here's an awesome...

Vance T Barfoot, (1919-2012), made the news at age 90 when his homeowners association told him he couldn't put up a flagpole. He did anyway. They told him to take it down. He told them to go pound sand. They backed down when the press got wind of a Medal of Honor winner being denied the right to fly his flag every day.

http://cellar.org/2014/barfoot.jpg

May 23, 1944, near Carano, Italy, Van T. Barfoot, who had enlisted in 1940, set out alone to flank German machine gun positions that were raining hell on his buddies. He picked his way through a minefield and proceeded to single-handedly take out three enemy machine gun positions, returning with 17 prisoners.
Then after lunch, he took on and took out three German tanks sent to retake the machine gun positions.

Barfoot retired as a Colonel after serving in Korea and Vietnam

WIKI says
Quote:

Having grown up in the strictly segregated south, Barfoot was noted for a comment he made in 1945 regarding African-Americans. Mississippi senator and Ku Klux Klan member Theodore G. Bilbo asked Barfoot if he had much trouble with the African-American soldiers he had served with during the war. To Bilbo's embarrassment, Barfoot responded, "I found out after I did some fighting in this war that the colored boys fight just as good as the white boys...I've changed my idea a lot about colored people since I got into this war and so have a lot of other boys from the south".

Gravdigr 12-12-2014 08:08 AM

1 Attachment(s)
U.S. Army MSG Roy P. Benavidez:

Attachment 49821

Quote:


Master Sergeant (then Staff Sergeant) Roy P. BENAVIDEZ United States Army, distinguished himself by a series of daring and extremely valorous actions on 2 May 1968 while assigned to Detachment B56, 5th Special Forces Group (Airborne), 1st Special Forces, Republic of Vietnam.

On the morning of 2 May 1968, a 12-man Special Forces Reconnaissance Team was inserted by helicopters in a dense jungle area west of Loc Ninh, Vietnam to gather intelligence information about confirmed large-scale enemy activity. This area was controlled and routinely patrolled by the North Vietnamese Army. After a short period of time on the ground, the team met heavy enemy resistance, and requested emergency extraction. Three helicopters attempted extraction, but were unable to land due to intense enemy small arms and anti-aircraft fire.

Sergeant BENAVIDEZ was at the Forward Operating Base in Loc Ninh monitoring the operation by radio when these helicopters returned to off-load wounded crew members and to assess aircraft damage. Sergeant Benavidez voluntarily boarded a returning aircraft to assist in another extraction attempt. Realizing that all the team members were either dead or wounded and unable to move to the pickup zone, he directed the aircraft to a nearby clearing where he jumped from the hovering helicopter, and ran approximately 75 meters under withering small arms fire to the crippled team.

Prior to reaching the team's position he was wounded in his right leg, face, and head. Despite these painful injuries, he took charge, repositioning the team members and directing their fire to facilitate the landing of an extraction aircraft, and the loading of wounded and dead team members. He then threw smoke canisters to direct the aircraft to the team's position. Despite his severe wounds and under intense enemy fire, he carried and dragged half of the wounded team members to the awaiting aircraft. He then provided protective fire by running alongside the aircraft as it moved to pick up the remaining team members. As the enemy's fire intensified, he hurried to recover the body and classified documents on the dead team leader.

When he reached the leader's body, Sergeant BENAVIDEZ was severely wounded by small arms fire in the abdomen and grenade fragments in his back. At nearly the same moment, the aircraft pilot was mortally wounded, and his helicopter crashed. Although in extremely critical condition due to his multiple wounds, Sergeant Benavidez secured the classified documents and made his way back to the wreckage, where he aided the wounded out of the overturned aircraft, and gathered the stunned survivors into a defensive perimeter. Under increasing enemy automatic weapons and grenade fire, he moved around the perimeter distributing water and ammunition to his weary men, reinstilling in them a will to live and fight. Facing a buildup of enemy opposition with a beleaguered team, Sergeant BENAVIDEZ mustered his strength, began calling in tactical air strikes and directed the fire from supporting gunships to suppress the enemy's fire and so permit another extraction attempt.

He was wounded again in his thigh by small arms fire while administering first aid to a wounded team member just before another extraction helicopter was able to land. His indomitable spirit kept him going as he began to ferry his comrades to the craft. On his second trip with the wounded, he was clubbed from behind by an enemy soldier. In the ensuing hand-to-hand combat, he sustained additional wounds to his head and arms before killing his adversary.[4][note 1] He then continued under devastating fire to carry the wounded to the helicopter. Upon reaching the aircraft, he spotted and killed two enemy soldiers who were rushing the craft from an angle that prevented the aircraft door gunner from firing upon them. With little strength remaining, he made one last trip to the perimeter to ensure that all classified material had been collected or destroyed, and to bring in the remaining wounded.

Only then, in extremely serious condition from numerous wounds and loss of blood, did he allow himself to be pulled into the extraction aircraft. Sergeant BENAVIDEZS' gallant choice to join voluntarily his comrades who were in critical straits, to expose himself constantly to withering enemy fire, and his refusal to be stopped despite numerous severe wounds, saved the lives of at least eight men. His fearless personal leadership, tenacious devotion to duty, and extremely valorous actions in the face of overwhelming odds were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service, and reflect the utmost credit on him and the United States Army.

sexobon 12-12-2014 03:05 PM

I met Roy, professionally, though I didn't know him personally. He was a guest speaker at graduation ceremonies at Fort Sam Houston, TX (Army Medical Department Headquarters and campus) in which area (San Antonio) Roy was retired, now buried, and where I was assigned as an SF medical instructor for one of the medical phases (didactic) of the Special Forces Qualification Course teaching SF medical specialist candidates.

I've met five Medal of Honor recipients, attended an NCO breakfast with one and even had Easter dinner with another (short story for another time). They didn't know me from Adam; but, they all showed humility and graciousness.

footfootfoot 12-12-2014 08:00 PM

I'd be willing to bet arrogance and a gargantuan ego don't leave enough room for putting others first and thus being able do perform these feats of heroism.

sexobon 12-12-2014 09:43 PM

Short Story
 
You'd win that bet. Those are enduring traits.

While I was a student at the Defense Language Institute, Presidio of Monterey, CA, I was stuck there without enough time to fly home for Easter. As the ranking NCO I had administrative duties as a student leader; so, I put on my dress uniform and went to Easter dinner in the enlisted mess hall to ensure everything was going well for the other students there.

As I was sitting down at a table with my dinner tray, a full colonel came into the enlisted mess wearing his dress uniform accompanied by a woman in civilian attire. They went through the food service line; then, paused and looked around until he saw the SF insignia on my uniform. They came over to my table and he asked if they could join me.

As I invited them to sit down I saw Donlon on his nametag. It rang a bell as the name was required learning during SF training on unit lineage and historically key personnel: a *Captain Donlon was the first SF Medal of Honor recipient. I immediately looked to the top ribbon on his uniform and there it was, blue field with 5 white stars, the Medal of Honor.

I tasked a student at the next table with rounding up all the SFers present in the mess hall to join me with our distinguished guests. They stopped in the middle of their dinners, up and moved their dining tables together with ours and were appreciative of Colonel and Mrs. Donlon, there for language training themselves, spending their holiday with the troops. It's about the only time I wished I was better at small talk because I was embarrassingly at a loss for words.

*TRIVIA - There's a one word disparity between what the award citation says and what Special Forces Schools teaches in the qualification course. That disparity is actually pointed out during training. It's long been one of the ways those who actually went through the SF qualification course could identify those who just claim they did in three questions or less.

footfootfoot 12-12-2014 11:03 PM

I would be humbled and I'm sure tongue tied in his presence.

xoxoxoBruce 12-13-2014 12:11 AM

I would ask any of them, When you were doing what they gave you the CMoH for doing, were you telling yourself it was for God & Country, or to benefit friends and yourself?

I'd bet a lot it was a kill them before they kill my friends and myself. Someone had to do it and they were the one who stepped up because of happenstance & confidence, but not their Eagle Scout Oath, Mom's apple pie, or baseball.

sexobon 12-13-2014 12:43 AM

There've been a number of studies on the psychology behind heroism in combat. Essentially, they do it to save the people they're with, enabled by a strong sense of responsibility for those who are dependent on them. Confidence has less to do with it as some have gone into those situations expecting to be killed; but, they still had to try. They all know part of it is happenstance, that there are posthumous awards, and that there are comparable unwitnessed acts that never received official recognition.

xoxoxoBruce 12-13-2014 01:16 AM

It's easy to believe for every Medal of Honor winner there's at least a hundred equally impressive actions going unrecognized. I've read a few stories about people's actions that were nominated for medals, but shot down. Not just the Medal of Honor, but lessor decorations too. I'd read it and wonder how in hell they made that determination. :rolleyes:

sexobon 12-13-2014 01:44 AM

That's why Obama had Medal of Honor recommendations that were declined reassessed and why other decorations don't mean much outside of the military.

There's a similar phenomenon with the characterization of military service. The federal government issues discharge papers both with and without the type of discharge on it. In some states it's unlawful for an employer to ask for a job applicant's type of discharge (honorable>---<dishonorable).

xoxoxoBruce 12-13-2014 02:07 AM

Do they still do "general" discharges too?

sexobon 12-13-2014 02:36 AM

I believe there are 5 types of discharges and General is still one of them. There's Entry Level, Honorable, General, Other Than Honorable, and Dishonorable. I'm waiting for them to come out with an Accidental Discharge for former Commanders-in-Chief.

xoxoxoBruce 12-13-2014 02:52 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by sexobon (Post 916276)
There's Entry Level, Honorable, General, Other Than Honorable, and Dishonorable.

"Other Than Honorable" sure fires the imagination.
Well it's not down to Dishonorable(F), but not up to General(C), more like between criminal and acceptable... a D. :eyebrow:

sexobon 12-13-2014 03:02 AM

That one must be for the politically incorrect.

DanaC 12-13-2014 04:39 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by sexobon (Post 916262)
There've been a number of studies on the psychology behind heroism in combat. Essentially, they do it to save the people they're with, enabled by a strong sense of responsibility for those who are dependent on them. Confidence has less to do with it as some have gone into those situations expecting to be killed; but, they still had to try. They all know part of it is happenstance, that there are posthumous awards, and that there are comparable unwitnessed acts that never received official recognition.

I bet they are really interesting studies.

I've read studies on the other side of the coin - cowardice. Or rather, desertion and the fact that cowardice/fear of battle seems to rarely be a factor.

sexobon 12-13-2014 11:43 AM

Desertion is a big umbrella with a myriad of reasons for it. Some have been known to desert because they got a Dear John/Jane letter from their romantic interest back home. Cowardice in the face of the enemy; however, has even been the subject of televised ethics debates with distinguished panelists (e.g. Supreme Court Justices, war correspondents, lawyers, human rights activists, first echelon military combat officers ... etc. all on the same panel).

The reasons for desertion under fire are fewer. They run along the lines of undiagnosed predisposition to panic attacks, mental fatigue and sense of doom, nervous breakdown ... etc. Most everyone experiences fear in combat; but, that can usually be overcome by peer pressure and training to the point where reactions to danger become reflexive.

The consensus; however, is that the damage done by someone turning and running in the face of the enemy is so great (demoralizing friendlies and emboldening enemies in addition to resulting immediate loses) that this umbrella is labeled cowardice and all those caught in the act will be shot by their own regardless of etiology because the damage is all the same. That can be the only way to make the spot correction under those circumstances. It isn't human nature to put the mission and other lives at risk to sort out why someone turned and ran; or, to try and figure out if they will fire on friendlies to get away.

footfootfoot 12-13-2014 11:48 AM

"We must all hang together, or surely, we will all hang separately."

Big Sarge 12-13-2014 12:27 PM

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I've never spoken to a MOH soldier, but I have seen one. It was PFC Desmond Doss. He's a hero to me. This man was a conscientious objector, who faced great ridicule and persecution. Never, ever think a man is weak or a coward because he refuses to fight for religious convictions.

Rank and organization: Private First Class, United States Army, Medical Detachment, 307th Infantry, 77th Infantry Division.

Place and date: Near Urasoe Mura, Okinawa, Ryukyu Islands, April 29, 1945 – May 21, 1945.
Entered service at: Lynchburg, Virginia
Birth: Lynchburg, Virginia
G.O. No.: 97, November 1, 1945

He was a company aid man when the 1st Battalion assaulted a jagged escarpment 400 feet (120 m) high. As our troops gained the summit, a heavy concentration of artillery, mortar and machinegun fire crashed into them, inflicting approximately 75 casualties and driving the others back. Pfc. Doss refused to seek cover and remained in the fire-swept area with the many stricken, carrying all 75 casualties one-by-one to the edge of the escarpment and there lowering them on a rope-supported litter down the face of a cliff to friendly hands. On May 2, he exposed himself to heavy rifle and mortar fire in rescuing a wounded man 200 yards (180 m) forward of the lines on the same escarpment; and 2 days later he treated 4 men who had been cut down while assaulting a strongly defended cave, advancing through a shower of grenades to within 8 yards (7.3 m) of enemy forces in a cave's mouth, where he dressed his comrades' wounds before making 4 separate trips under fire to evacuate them to safety. On May 5, he unhesitatingly braved enemy shelling and small arms fire to assist an artillery officer. He applied bandages, moved his patient to a spot that offered protection from small arms fire and, while artillery and mortar shells fell close by, painstakingly administered plasma. Later that day, when an American was severely wounded by fire from a cave, Pfc. Doss crawled to him where he had fallen 25 feet (7.6 m) from the enemy position, rendered aid, and carried him 100 yards (91 m) to safety while continually exposed to enemy fire. On May 21, in a night attack on high ground near Shuri, he remained in exposed territory while the rest of his company took cover, fearlessly risking the chance that he would be mistaken for an infiltrating Japanese and giving aid to the injured until he was himself seriously wounded in the legs by the explosion of a grenade. Rather than call another aid man from cover, he cared for his own injuries and waited 5 hours before litter bearers reached him and started carrying him to cover. The trio was caught in an enemy tank attack and Pfc. Doss, seeing a more critically wounded man nearby, crawled off the litter; and directed the bearers to give their first attention to the other man. Awaiting the litter bearers' return, he was again struck, by a sniper bullet while being carried off the field by a comrade, this time suffering a compound fracture of 1 arm. With magnificent fortitude he bound a rifle stock to his shattered arm as a splint and then crawled 300 yards (270 m) over rough terrain to the aid station. Through his outstanding bravery and unflinching determination in the face of desperately dangerous conditions Pfc. Doss saved the lives of many soldiers. His name became a symbol throughout the 77th Infantry Division for outstanding gallantry far above and beyond the call of duty.

Take a moment of your day to watch this documentary. See if you are as in awe of this simple man as I am.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JKdwsWdH3A4

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VWheAfEFi_Q#t=142

http://www.desmonddoss.com/

DanaC 12-13-2014 01:21 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by sexobon (Post 916306)
Desertion is a big umbrella with a myriad of reasons for it. Some have been known to desert because they got a Dear John/Jane letter from their romantic interest back home. Cowardice in the face of the enemy; however, has even been the subject of televised ethics debates with distinguished panelists (e.g. Supreme Court Justices, war correspondents, lawyers, human rights activists, first echelon military combat officers ... etc. all on the same panel).

The reasons for desertion under fire are fewer. They run along the lines of undiagnosed predisposition to panic attacks, mental fatigue and sense of doom, nervous breakdown ... etc. Most everyone experiences fear in combat; but, that can usually be overcome by peer pressure and training to the point where reactions to danger become reflexive.

The consensus; however, is that the damage done by someone turning and running in the face of the enemy is so great (demoralizing friendlies and emboldening enemies in addition to resulting immediate loses) that this umbrella is labeled cowardice and all those caught in the act will be shot by their own regardless of etiology because the damage is all the same. That can be the only way to make the spot correction under those circumstances. It isn't human nature to put the mission and other lives at risk to sort out why someone turned and ran; or, to try and figure out if they will fire on friendlies to get away.

*nods*

There's been some really interesting stuff done on the psychology of desertion. Particularly for the modern era.

I know far more about desertion in the 18th/early 19th centuries though :P

One of the things that is quite striking about the scholarship though is the apparent degree of similarity of motive and incidence across different time periods and different army types.

DanaC 12-13-2014 01:31 PM

Heh. Went looking for my MA thesis online and found this:

http://books.google.co.uk/books/abou...AJ&redir_esc=y

Did not know it showed on Googlebooks. That is kinda fucking cool.

Griff 12-13-2014 02:07 PM

Well that is pretty fucking cool!

xoxoxoBruce 12-13-2014 02:13 PM

Tony UT Undertoad

http://cellar.org/2014/tony.jpg

An important blazing star in the Information Technology universe, like his contemporaries Bill Gates, Larry Page and Larry Ellison.

At great risk to his personal stability and financial future, he surfed the Dot Org wave to establish one of the solidly stable
cornerstones of the internet… Cellar Dot Org.
At great personal sacrifice, for twenty four years he’s worked tirelessly to keep this institution free from Easter Island hackers
who everyone knows have brought down some of the former giants like Netscape, MySpace, and Cosby.

Despite a schedule which would kill mere mortals, plus constant interruptions from Warren Buffet, Suze Orman and Wall Street
bankers begging advice, he’s been able to provide for family, allowed his mother to pursue her teaching career.

Civic responsibility has always been important to UT, so without fanfare he's quietly emptied the local mental institutions,
orphanages, homeless shelters and animal shelters............... Oh, and prevented EBOLA from coming here.

If that sounds like UT is all work and no play, nay nay, I say. He's a respected musician in the hot Philly/Jersey Shore music scene,
and sought out Feng shui adviser to the hip and wannabe hip.

Most importantly, his selfless dedication has provided us a stable shelter from reality.
So although he's worshipped here, many don't realize the extent of his influence and size of his fanbase.
His base is huge because all your base belong to him.


Hip Hip Hooray :cheerldr: Hip Hip Hooray :cheerldr: Hip Hip Hooray :cheerldr:

Gravdigr 12-13-2014 02:48 PM

:notworthy

fargon 12-14-2014 06:59 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Gravdigr (Post 916328)
:notworthy

Me Too

Gravdigr 12-24-2014 11:51 AM

I'm reasonably certain that Bob Welsh is an Awesome People.

Bob's a storyteller. Here's one of 'em:


Gravdigr 03-03-2015 11:38 PM

1 Attachment(s)
Ok, it took three months, but I finally ran across another Awesome People.

While doing some research for Popdigr on Lou Diamond Phillips, I learned that he is named after an old Leatherneck named Lou Diamond.

Attachment 50525

In fact, they call him 'Mr. Leatherneck':

Quote:

Named by his father for highly decorated Gunnery Sergeant Leland "Lou" Diamond, USMC, who enlisted in the Marines at age 27 in 1917, and saw action in both world wars. To this day "Lou" Diamond is considered one of the finest Marines of all time, and is known as "Mr. Leatherneck".
~ Lou Diamond Phillips' IMDb page

xoxoxoBruce 03-04-2015 01:27 PM

I can see in war time, how a soldier who was very good at fighting would be allowed slack when it came to dress and behavior. But I don't understand how he got away with not saluting, wearing jeans, or generally doing as he pleased, during peace time. I would think it should be high & tight when there was no war on.

Gravdigr 03-04-2015 04:21 PM

Cuz he was ♪ ♫awesome♪ ♫.

xoxoxoBruce 03-04-2015 05:12 PM

Awesome is another word for bigger target than the rest. :haha:

DanaC 03-04-2015 05:26 PM

I've just been in a glum mood all day. Not for anything in particular - stuff gets to me like the no money thang, but today wasn't particularly worrisome or eventful on that front - just woke up with the glums and haven't been able to shake it.

xoxoxoBruce 03-04-2015 09:35 PM

Are you trying to tell us awesome people have down days too? ;)

DanaC 03-05-2015 04:49 AM

wtf....that was supposed to be in the what's bumming you out thread....how did it get in here?

*shakes head*


But yeah - awesome people have bad days too lol

Gravdigr 03-05-2015 04:10 PM

Haha. Bruce just called you awesome.

Ha ha, you're awesome!

:mock:

xoxoxoBruce 03-05-2015 06:55 PM

Nah, my comma stopped off to take a piss and didn't catch up in time. tis Dana what be awesome.

Gravdigr 03-31-2015 01:59 PM

1 Attachment(s)
Bethanie is an Awesome People™.

Attachment 50850

For those unfortunates born without squint muscles:

Quote:

Dear Pilots Of The Plane Taking Me Home

In light of the very recent tragedy in the French Alps and the loss of those poor 150 people, I feel the need to reach out to you and extend a compassionate hand. At the end of the day, we are all humans just trying to live this rollercoaster of a life we have been handed. I understand an event so horrific as this one affects those with your responsibility more than others, and maybe sometimes a kind word, random but heartfelt, can make a difference. I’m hoping to create a ripple effect and spread some compassion and understanding.

Thank you for taking me home. Thank you for doing so safely. Thank you for allowing me to live the life I do in Spain and split my time with my family in England too. You make the excitement I feel now to see my family possible. I hope you get to see your families soon. I’ve had a wonderful flight and hope you have too.

You’re making a massive difference and you’re the reason I can smile tonight.

Take care and spread love,

Kindest regards,

Bethanie

glatt 03-31-2015 02:30 PM

Yes. She is.

Gravdigr 04-11-2015 04:20 PM

Thayne Hamilton and his late wife Chris...

...these are Awesome People™.



Grey Muzzle Sanctuary

Grey Muzzle Rescue's Gofundme page

The folks at TalkItUpTV are pretty cool, too. Here's their YouTube channel.

Gravdigr 04-28-2015 03:45 PM

I have a sneaking suspicion that Mr. Robert Valentine is an Awesome People™:


Gravdigr 05-15-2015 11:56 AM

Cellar, meet Ridge Quarles, he is an Awesome People™:


BigV 05-15-2015 07:31 PM

Yep.

BigV 05-28-2015 05:14 PM

alex lyngaas is an awesome person.


Gravdigr 05-29-2015 03:50 PM

That borders on weird, trying to get mom laid and all...

...But, he do love his Mammy! That is clear. And love is awesome.

Gravdigr 06-01-2015 02:32 PM

1 Attachment(s)
Harriet Thompson is an Awesome People™.

Attachment 51879

sexobon 06-07-2015 10:26 PM

1 Attachment(s)
Touching story from out Beestmonster way:

Michigan boy, 15, completes 57-mile walk with brother on his back

Attachment 51993

A 15-year-old Michigan boy on Sunday completed a three-day, 57-mile walk across the state, carrying his younger brother on his back, as part of a campaign to raise awareness for Cerebral Palsy.

Hunter Gandee started the long trek with little brother Braden, who suffers from Cerebral Palsy, on Friday morning in Lambertville, Michigan, an unincorporated community near the Ohio border.

The brothers reached the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor at about 4 p.m. on Sunday, joined for the final leg by friends and family. ...

... Hunter Gandee said the walk was not intended as a fundraiser, but rather an awareness campaign about the debilitating condition. During the hike, though, he rallied support to raise $200,000 toward the construction of a handicap accessible playground at Branden's school. ... cont'd.

DanaC 06-08-2015 05:54 AM

Look at the determination on the older brother's face. Their folks must be so proud of them.

Gravdigr 06-08-2015 06:14 PM

1 Attachment(s)
I thought this story sounded familiar...

Attachment 51995

I remember reading this story (the first time 'round). Absolute awesomeness.

classicman 06-09-2015 10:56 AM

Although a couple years old, Darnell is an Awesome guy...

Gravdigr 06-09-2015 04:26 PM

♪ ♫Awesome!!!♪ ♫

Gravdigr 07-02-2015 04:00 PM

Sher Polvinal is an Awesome People™.



House With a Heart

Gravdigr 07-13-2015 03:29 PM

1 Attachment(s)
Peter Murray is an Awesome People™. The Lynn Headwaters staff, and the folks at North Shore Rescue are pretty damn Awesome People™, too.

They all came through for Fraser The Dog after he had a rough day.

Attachment 52502

xoxoxoBruce 07-13-2015 03:38 PM

Outstanding. :thumb:

Gravdigr 07-14-2015 03:51 PM

I think pretty much everyone who knows who Dave Grohl is is aware that he's a pretty Awesome People™...But, we might as well make it official:

Guy comes to a Foo Fighters show, holds up a sign that says "It's my birthday, can I play drums?". You know what Dave did. We all know what Dave did. What did Dave do? He said get your ass up here, that's what he did.

And dude did, too:



Quote:

If you suck on the drums, I will personally tar & feather your ass backstage.
Dave Grohl, you fuckin' rock, man!

Gravdigr 07-14-2015 03:57 PM

Birthday dude was so stoked!

glatt 07-14-2015 03:58 PM

I wish I liked his music. That's the only way he could be better.

Gravdigr 07-15-2015 03:40 PM

I'm not too wild about the Foo Fighters'music either. Some of it's good.

Dave did do the best cover I think I've ever heard though. The White House was recognizing Paul McCartney for whatever reason, and Dave came out and knocked "Band On The Run" outta the park with what I think was probably Paul's band, I've seen him (Paul) with one or two of those guys since.

It was completely awesome.

Gravdigr 07-15-2015 03:44 PM

Damn. This was 5 years ago!

Check it:



:devil:


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