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Old 08-07-2010, 01:22 PM   #1
Lamplighter
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A bit of history found in the attic

When we moved into our house in Buffalo we found some newspapers and stuff in our attic.
We kept a few clippings of ads, pictures and news items.
I guess things haven't changed a whole lot..
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Old 08-07-2010, 01:49 PM   #2
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Have you considered offering those to the Women's History Museum in Seneca Falls, N.Y.? The town was the birthplace of the American Women's Suffrage movement. I don't recall seeing things like that in the collection.
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Old 08-12-2010, 11:06 AM   #3
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IMHO -Replace womens sufferage with Obamacare and you will have the teaparty Republican platform for 2010 and beyond .
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Old 08-12-2010, 11:56 AM   #4
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Oh its set in 1848 in the crush of New York state
and the thing about destiny is it never ever makes mistakes

Susan B. Anthony
Forever haunting me
Owned raped sold thrown
A woman was never her own

They cried freedom rise up for me

I want I want I want freedom

Oh its set in 1848 in the crush of New York state
and the thing about destiny is it never ever sets you free

Elizabeth Cady
Forever reminding me
I dont steal the air I breathe

Freedom rise up for me
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Old 08-12-2010, 12:05 PM   #5
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Jinx, I'm smiling, and putting that on my shelf right along side "Strange Fruit"... different gendra but much the same.

Thank you.
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Old 10-23-2010, 11:43 AM   #6
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I have really mixed feelings about posting this, but if nothing else it shows briefly
a connection between generations in our family.

Ten years ago my Dad passed away. He was 94, raised on a small Kentucky tenant farm,
did not graduate high school, hitchhiked to Detroit during the Depression,
took correspondence courses to become an electrician, and worked for General Motors.

Then last year my daughter told me that over the years he had been writing letters to her.
I knew nothing about it, and was really surprised that he had never mentioned that he was writing to her.

Yesterday, Rachael came across those letters. She sent me a copy of one.
It was truly touching for me because it sounded just like my Dad as I remember him as an adult.
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Old 10-23-2010, 12:10 PM   #7
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Wow. What an amazing letter. Thanks for sharing.
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Old 10-23-2010, 03:04 PM   #8
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I can see that in my own family. Gramps had no use for them while doing his business of selling firewood in the city. He often cautioned me about them, although when a black neighbor (only one in town) lost his wife, then his land, Gramps gave him a piece of land to live on.
Judgmental of them as a group, but willing to accept a man of any color, based on that man's behavior/qualities. The catch 22 is, when you are distrustful of a group, you may never have a chance to learn one man's qualities.

Pop had some black men working for him. Some were good workers, some were bums (duh), and he treated them accordingly. He wouldn't do anything to try and prevent it, but would really rather they didn't move in next door. I think that's because his shop was in a poor neighborhood, and he was critical of the way the neighbors lived with trash/junk in the yards and vacant lots.

I see good and bad comes in all colors, but I was chafed by the favoritism shown minorities at work. If I got caught breaking a rule, I had to suffer the consequences. If a black man did the same, the reps in the black employees association would pull an Al Sharpton, threaten to go to the labor relations board, and the company would back down immediately. Of course the company would never sanction a white employees association.
There was only a very small percentage of the black men that were a problem, and some were as disgusted with the situation as I was, but it still made me resentful.

I would like to think if I had a kid in his twenties he'd be tolerant, but realistically that would depend on his exposure and experiences.
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