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Old 03-01-2017, 10:43 PM   #1
xoxoxoBruce
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Mar 2nd, 2017: First Cruise Ship

It could be argued that Odysseus’ Galley, Magellan’s Trinidad, Erik the Red’s Langskip, or Columbus’ Santa
Maria, were cruising, although none were for pleasure. But the SS Prinzessin Victoria Luise, is credited with
being the first purpose built cruise ship Grand Daddy Mommy of the monsters of today. Launched in 1900,
it was a German passenger ship of the Hamburg-America Line, and the epitome of luxury.



120 first-class cabins, interior design approved by the German emperor, and amenities including a library,
a gymnasium, and even a darkroom for the development of film by amateur photographers.
At 15 knots(28 km/h), she was not as quick as the liners, but for a passenger-only ship it was revolutionary.
A novel idea following an experiment by German shipping magnate, Albert Ballin.



In 1888, Ballin noticed that one of his company’s largest flagship ocean liners, the SS Augusta Victoria sat
idle most of the winter, because travelers preferred to cross the North Atlantic when it was warmer. So he
decided to send the Augusta Victoria on a 58-day “pleasure voyage” from Germany via the Mediterranean
to the Orient. The cruise included well-planned excursions ashore and ports-of-call along the route.
The voyage was a huge success and introduced the concept of the “floating hotel”.



The SS Prinzessin Victoria Luise was a great success until the night of Dec 16th 1906, as they attempted to
enter the harbor of Kingston, Jamaica. The Captain mixed up the lighthouses and headed for the wrong one
at 14 knots, hitting and climbing the shallow rocks at 9.30pm. The engines were put full astern but the ship
wasn’t moving. The captain retired to his cabin and shot himself. Passengers were rescued in the morning,
but the salvage operations declared the ship a total loss.

link
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Old 03-02-2017, 08:15 AM   #2
glatt
 
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I like their nod to sailing by having two masts on this engine powered boat.
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Old 03-02-2017, 11:03 AM   #3
xoxoxoBruce
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You could do King-of-The-World in the crows nest.
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Old 03-02-2017, 12:09 PM   #4
captainhook455
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Quote:
Originally Posted by glatt View Post
I like their nod to sailing by having two masts on this engine powered boat.
If the wind was blowing and the boat rocking having the sails up would slow the rolling of the ship.



tarheel
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Old 03-04-2017, 01:27 PM   #5
Diaphone Jim
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Helen may have been responsible for 1000 ships, but various Princess Louises haven't done badly either.
I guess "stateroom" used to mean a large public room (looks like the dining room in the link) instead of an individual cabin.
I think ocean cruising is probably beneath the 1%, but the cost must pretty well limit it to the 5% or so.
Any arguments in favor of the practice here?
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Old 03-04-2017, 04:24 PM   #6
xoxoxoBruce
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The stateroom in my link is called the "sleeping cabin".

Googling brings...
Quote:
A state room in a large European mansion is usually one of a suite of very grand rooms which were designed to impress. The term was most widely used in the 17th and 18th centuries.

Your room on a cruise ship is called a cabin (or stateroom) and is akin to a hotel room, but typically much smaller. Choosing a cruise ship cabin can be fun and challenging at the same time, and not just a little bit frustrating on occasion.

On board a ship, the term state room defines a superior first-class cabin.

In the United States, riverboat passenger rooms were often named after a state, e.g., Alabama, Florida.
Queen Mary, 7 nights, Southampton to NY, Aug 31st, Int Cabin $1500 Suite $5000
Queen Mary, 7 nights. NY to Southampton, Oct 20th, Int Cabin $1000 suite $4000 (Oct can get nasty on the North Atlantic)
That's doable, however airfare is cheaper even with 6 nights accommodation at the other end.

But cruises are a whole different animal, the sky's the limit on that shit.
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