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Old 12-26-2015, 07:27 AM   #31
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fargon, like any quiet gentleman, becomes lucid and wordy when you finally figure out his fascination.
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Old 12-26-2015, 07:35 AM   #32
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I lurves me some antique engines.
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Old 12-26-2015, 08:48 AM   #33
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I found an article on Wikipedia that says that the biggest problems with the McKeen cars was reliability of the engines. I think that they had too many moving parts. Here is the article: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/McKeen...ny#Motor_truck
The biggest problem they were having was trying to adapt marine engines for rail use. Also the lack of a clutch hampered operation. Internal combustion electric drive was in it infancy, and used successfully by other makers. The Denver and Rio Grande railroads Galloping Goose used a Pierce Arrow automotive power plant with success. The problem with the McKeen cars was an unreliable power plant.
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Old 12-26-2015, 11:29 AM   #34
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...the horizontal cast steel engine bed was also described as a structural member. The straight-6 engine had an 11-inch (279 mm) bore and 15-inch (381 mm) stroke, for a total displacement of 8,553 cubic inches (140.16 L); it developed 300 horsepower (220 kW).
Good grief.
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Old 12-26-2015, 11:56 AM   #35
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With no clutch at the time that could handle the output of that engine. Direct drive scary.
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Old 12-26-2015, 03:03 PM   #36
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I found an article on the McKeen Motor Cars; http://www.shiawasseehistory.com/mckeen.html
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Old 12-26-2015, 03:09 PM   #37
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I never did find out much about direct reversible gasoline engines. Only that they existed for a time and went away with out a wimper.
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Old 12-26-2015, 03:14 PM   #38
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William McKeen was the Union Pacific Railroad’s Superintendent of Motive Power when he, and/or staff, came up with this design. The Railroad built the first four cars, and subsequent units were constructed by McKeen in leased space at Union Pacific’s Omaha Shops. So McKeen started a company to build this design.

I wonder if that was Union Pacific didn't want to risk liability?
Couldn't convince stockholders this was a geed investment?
Up's charter wouldn't allow to selling to other railroads?
McKeen's name was on the patents, unlikely if he was working for UP?
It was a sweetheart deal between McKeen and the UP brass?

I also wonder what engines were used in the first four?
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The first McKeen Car was built in 1904-5, and was reported complete in March of 1905. This car was built with a steel frame and wood body, was 31′ feet long, and sat 25 passengers. It had a Riotti 50 H.P. Gasoline engine, which, when tested in the Omaha Yards, proved too weak for a train car of that size, and in two months, a 100 H.P. Riotti engine was fitted before it was sent off to Grand Island, Neb. for further testing.
They whole concept of an unassailable giant like Union Pacific, trying to carry the public on the cheap, is kind of scary. I mean if you try to raise corn or rabbits and fail, then it's too bad. Carrying 80 people and fail, is much more serious. But in those days, Union Pacific might refund the price of the ticket... to the next of kin. Think how little White Star paid to Titanic victims.
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Old 12-26-2015, 03:31 PM   #39
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OK, after the first four cars built by UP, they started using an engine of McKeen's design, except 3 Rottis, 1 Samet, and 1 Sterling.
The cars McKeen built for other railroads had his engine or Hall-Scott, or Winton engines.
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Old 12-29-2015, 12:01 PM   #40
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Here's a Stover from that era.
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Old 12-30-2015, 10:45 AM   #41
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And winter in the Rockies...
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Old 01-15-2016, 05:01 PM   #42
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1943 menus with the highest priced item on each.

Burlington


New York Central


Frisco and Dixie
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Old 01-15-2016, 11:48 PM   #43
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Wiki says...
Quote:
The Shay locomotive was the most widely used geared steam locomotive. The locomotives were built to the patents of Ephraim Shay, who has been credited with the popularization of the concept of a geared steam locomotive. Although the design of Ephraim Shay's early locomotives differed from later ones, there is a clear line of development that joins all Shays.
The strength of these engines is that all wheels, including, in some engines, those under the tender, are driven so that all the weight develops tractive effort. A high ratio of piston strokes to wheel revolutions allowed them to run at partial slip, where a conventional rod engine would spin its drive wheels and burn rails, losing all traction.
I'm guessing there's some track under that water.
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Old 01-17-2016, 10:55 AM   #44
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Quote:
Originally Posted by xoxoxoBruce View Post
Wiki says...


I'm guessing there's some track under that water.
I wonder when that baby went out of service...
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Old 01-17-2016, 11:41 AM   #45
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Apparently two more years hauling wood. This picture shows how 12 wheels were driven, including the tender's wheels, for maximum traction.

You can read the "stories" here.
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