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Old 12-05-2017, 06:18 PM   #16
Gravdigr
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Location: South Central...KY that is
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Happy Monkey View Post
If you get one, make sure it's intended for camping/hiking. A GPS intended for driving won't be useful ("Hm. Green in all directions").
Popdigr has a couple that leave a breadcrumb trail. Drops a dot every so often, like a waypoint, so you can not only find where you came from, you can find the exact way you came in.

Excellent for hunting/hiking.
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Old 12-05-2017, 06:25 PM   #17
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Never heard of 'fire paste'. Great concept.

Vaseline-soaked cotton balls are an excellent fire starter.
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Old 12-05-2017, 08:38 PM   #18
captainhook455
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Quote:
Originally Posted by glatt View Post
I've got a big backpacking trip with a Boy Scout crew that I'm leading in the summer. This will be in New Mexico where it will be in the 30s-40s in the morning and over 100 in the afternoon. There will be sun beating down, and also drenching thunderstorms.

They helpfully provide a packing list specific to their program. Broken down by personal gear and group gear. As a single person, you would have to carry everything yourself, so it would all be personal gear.

http://www.philmontscoutranch.org/Tr...attoBring.aspx
Did you know there are two routes? The northern and southern trails. We took the northern. When we got back to the main station and described our trip to the southern bunch they said they wished they went north.
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Old 12-05-2017, 08:57 PM   #19
captainhook455
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Unless you are a gourmet cook then only one pot is needed and get the Teflon type, because all aluminum is a bitch to clean. Then there is dehydrated food. Everything is edible except anything with potatoes. Tear the pack open and hold close to the pot. Any slight wind will blow the spices away. Get a collapsible water jug with handle that can be strapped to outside of pack. Also you need a bell to hang on the pack so you don't spook any bears.

When walking away from camp put your stuff in the tent.
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Old 12-05-2017, 09:42 PM   #20
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Yes! We get to enter a lottery for our preferred route in February.
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Old 12-05-2017, 11:12 PM   #21
monster
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What Glatt said about wood. No GPS -certainly not on the first attempt. FIND OUT IF YOU LIKE IT FIRST. Hike a marked trail, don't go too far from your car. stay minimal -in expense as well as weight. I disagree w tarheel, a cheap aluminum pan set will be fine for the first venture out, It's light, disposable (financially) after the trip is over so it doesn't matter if you don't do a great clean-up job, and having more than one pan is helpful if you want to boil water for hot drink as well as cook food. Also, dried meals are disgusting and enough to put you off camping for life. Take real food as much as space and time allow. Pasta, canned corned beef and tomato paste (get a tube not a can) can make pretty tasty/satisfying eating after a day's hiking.
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Old 12-05-2017, 11:23 PM   #22
Pamela
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Argh! I wrote a three page response with tips and advice and everything, then accidentally erased it all. I *hate* the touchpad!
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Old 12-06-2017, 06:57 AM   #23
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I agree with Pam.
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Old 12-06-2017, 08:21 AM   #24
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bbro
ok, just to make sure everyone understands - No Friends. For anything. Why do you think I'm going in the woods alone?
Okay, but hear me out for just a second. People who have lots of camping experience regularly get lost, and subsequently die, in the woods. Even with a GPS unit. Someone with no camping experience is even more likely to do so. Please at least tell someone where you're going, in specific detail, and when they should expect you back, so if you don't show up they'll alert the park service.

Also, watch the movie 127 hours. A.) It's fucking awesome, B.) it's a true story, and C.) the moral of the story is apropos.
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Old 12-06-2017, 09:17 AM   #25
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I don't disagree with anyone here.

The problem is that you can spend a ton of money before you even find out if you like it. And even people who do a lot of camping are often reevaluating the gear they use. The opportunities to spend money never go away.

The absolute best thing to do is to go camping with somebody who already has all the gear so you don't have to spend anything. I know you said that's not really an option. Keep looking for group events. If you aren't planning on anything until next fall, you have lots of time. why wait though? Spring camping is fun too, and you don't have to commit to a week long adventure or anything. Just go out on a Saturday morning and come back on Sunday.

If you really decide you want to buy a bunch of gear, come back and talk about each item. So much of this is specific to what you want to do and also your style. Camping choices are just as personal as everything else in life. It's actually fun to go to a big crowded campground and walk around to see how everyone has their site set up.

I'm not such a fan of buying disposable junk gear to get started and then buying the more expensive good stuff after a while. You can find good stuff for a moderate price and use it for years if you shop around and ask for advice about specific items here.
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Old 12-06-2017, 10:05 AM   #26
captainhook455
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If you don't clean your cookware properly then you will spend some time squatting in the woods. Be careful not to use poison ivy leaves to wipe your butt.
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Old 12-06-2017, 10:29 AM   #27
bbro
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@glatt - I am getting new boots. I'll be hiking in the mountains in January, so I need them soon. I think the GPS would be helpful even if I am just hiking and I plan to do that regardless if I continue camping. I agree with the cost. I don't have to wait until fall, I suppose. I was looking for something to do to relax in April after a long training schedule, so I was thinking of trying then. I am looking at classes at REI, but some of those cost $70+ without any equipment cost.

@lumberjim - I will keep those in mind - thanks!

@Gravdigr - that's a good idea. I can look for one of those......I've gotten lost in a trailed park before. It's easy to lose the trail in the leaves!!

@monster - this isn't my first time in the woods, ever. I hike regularly.

@Pamela - sorry, that sucks

@Clodfobble - I always let someone know when I am hiking on the mountain trails far from home. At the local trails, there is constant cell service. I make sure to research the parks I hike at. There's one that will send out search and rescue if your car is still in the lot at closing, so they have suggestions on information to leave. I would do the same with camping. I think with camping, I have to check in and out with the rangers, so they would definitely know. I was even thinking of seeing if there was a GPS that someone could follow online.

@captainhook - I can buy biodegradable toilet paper - poison ivy threat REMOVED!
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Old 12-06-2017, 10:50 AM   #28
monster
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sorry I offended by not being clear, I was talking about the camping, not the hiking. I wish you all he best whatever you decide
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Old 12-06-2017, 11:09 AM   #29
glatt
 
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You seem pretty adamant about a GPS, and that's cool. It's your choice. You might want to check out apps for your phone first, because there are a handful of hiking GPS apps out there. An Anker battery charger to keep your phone topped off is a lot cheaper than a GPS unit. You download the maps to your phone, and then you don't even need a cell signal because the GPS will work without it if you have the maps on your phone.



tldr of the video is some good apps are:
Guthook's Hiking Guide
Gaia
Google Maps
All Trails
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Old 12-06-2017, 11:57 AM   #30
bbro
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@monster - there was no offense. It just seemed like the assumption was there that I hadn't ever entered the woods. I appreciate the input, I just wanted to clarify

@glatt - Do you think it's not necessary on solo hikes? I've been doing longer mountain hikes lately and want to continue regardless of camping future. I figured it was something I could use that would help people find me, but I wasn't sure. I was going to do more research. There are some that can send out an SOS signal.

I used runkeeper last time and my phone barely (I accidentally shut it off near the end) lasted the entire hike which is why I was thinking of a dedicated GPS. Do you think these apps will still work without data and wifi? I think if I turn those off, I can squeeze some more battery out if it. How do you download the maps? Does that just come with the apps?
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