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Old 07-21-2007, 04:52 AM   #46
Squid_Operator
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Handy?











Hitting a bound girl with it? noo.........




Wait what?...
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Old 07-21-2007, 05:16 AM   #47
bluecuracao
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Well, it sure looks functional.
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Old 07-21-2007, 05:18 AM   #48
Squid_Operator
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Crude should be a synonym for functional.
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Old 07-21-2007, 08:40 AM   #49
SteveDallas
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Wait, you use this to keep the squids in line?
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Old 07-21-2007, 09:21 AM   #50
xoxoxoBruce
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bluecuracao View Post
Okay, that's the problem--you're worried about the way it's going to look, which I can understand in your line of work. In the case of a roof, it has to be very functional and long-wearing, i.e. tight and sealed.
A long piece of roll roofing is not like fabric, it's like a wide, thin board. It can roll and flex, and it can twist, but it can't change it's rectangular shape, unless it's very, very hot. Rolled out flat, it has to be straight... like the edge of the roof. The only way you can make it crooked, is to cut it up in a bunch of short pieces.

If the top layer (straight), and the bottom layer (not straight), don't match, being cemented it will seal out wind driven water and ice damns. But it will make a weaker edge that will deteriorate much faster.

The edges can be made to match, using care, with either method. But using a single piece is faster and easier.
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Old 07-21-2007, 04:28 PM   #51
Squid_Operator
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R U SQUIDDIN'!!?? I know I'm Squiddin'!
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Old 07-22-2007, 12:25 AM   #52
DucksNuts
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I seriously....groaned out loud....GOL I guess?
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Old 07-23-2007, 02:18 PM   #53
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The pictures of my project would be much less interesting than BigV's, so I won't be posting any.

Over the weekend, I installed a bathroom vent fan in a small bathroom that had none before.

This meant:

1. Putting a new circuit breaker into an empty slot in the panel, running the romex to the 1st floor bathroom wall where I installed a GFCI receptacle and a switch (had to fish the wire for this part,) then running it back down into the basement and up the open wall where I'll be re-tiling a shower and into the open ceiling above that gutted shower. The fan will be GFCI protected.

2. Pulling out the ladder and cutting a hole in the second story exterior wall for the vent hood. Caulk around the hole, slide the hood in, and screw it tight.

3. Crawling around in the hot very cramped nasty eaves to get the flexible ductwork installed and nice and straight. This was a major pain, as a bunch of loose fill insulation had fallen down into the eaves from the attic and I didn't want to stir it up too much. I got a nasty cramp in one leg while I was all contorted trying to tighten up the clamp holding the duct to the hood.

4. Install the fan between the ceiling joists, connect the ductwork to the fan. This actually took a fair amount of time as I had to shim the joists to account for the new drywall ceiling I'll need to install.

5. Wire up the fan to the romex I installed earlier.

6. Try to act all nonchalant when the damn thing worked on the first test.

7. Clean up.
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Old 07-23-2007, 02:22 PM   #54
wolf
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I am crafty, but not handy, unless you count being able to substitute a bunch of linked paperclips for the ball chain that's in the toilet tank ...
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Old 07-23-2007, 04:47 PM   #55
Clodfobble
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Sure, you guys install roofs and air vents and crap, but I creatively reattached Barbie's legs while retaining functionality.
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Old 07-23-2007, 04:53 PM   #56
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Clodfobble View Post
...I creatively reattached Barbie's legs while retaining functionality.
I used to make Transformers out of Legos. The three-way kind, IE plane/tank/robot.
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Old 07-23-2007, 05:43 PM   #57
Happy Monkey
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I had a ton of house parts, so I made Transformers that became houses. Sucks to be them.

I also made little Gobot-types out of paper, and I still have a couple of them.


As for the original question, I've put a soap tray back into the shower wall after I knocked it out, but I'm leery of anything major. I'm not sure what percentage of that leery is laziness, though.
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Old 07-23-2007, 05:58 PM   #58
yesman065
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wolf View Post
I am crafty, but not handy, unless you count being able to substitute a bunch of linked paperclips for the ball chain that's in the toilet tank ...
Watch out they rust pretty quickly - been there done that.
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Old 07-23-2007, 06:04 PM   #59
bluecuracao
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Clodfobble View Post
Sure, you guys install roofs and air vents and crap, but I creatively reattached Barbie's legs while retaining functionality.
How did you do that??!
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Old 07-23-2007, 06:29 PM   #60
Clodfobble
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Rubber bands, a little dexterity, and a lot of patience.
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