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Old 12-27-2013, 11:49 PM   #16
xoxoxoBruce
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The amount of material used in the construction was enormous: 300,000 feet of timber were used in the falsework, 4,700 cubic yards of earth and rock had to be excavated, and 45,000 sacks of cement were used. The means of transporting the materials across the canyon came from platforms and slings suspended from a cable 300 feet above the creek. Cement was chosen instead of steel due to material and maintenance costs. The cement came from Davenport, near Santa Cruz, and from San Andreas. The creek below supplied the needed water for the mix.
I wonder how many Redwoods died for that bridge?

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The falsework, which was the wooden structure built to shape the arch and form the wet concrete, was one of the outstanding accomplishments of E.C. Panton, the general superintendent of Ward Engineering Co. Credit also went to C.H. Purcell, California state highway engineer, F.W. Panhorst, acting bridge engineer, and I.O. Jahlstrom, resident engineer. Two months were spent building the falsework alone. One of the main difficulties was raising and holding the arch frame, exposed as it was to the high winds. The foundation also had to resist the waves which at times reached its base. Work was halted for a time until the dangers of winter storms passed.
Monterey Historical.
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Old 12-28-2013, 12:44 AM   #17
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I used to motorcycle across it on a fairly regular basis when I lived in Monterey. Great ride, really let the good times roll (yes, I rode a Kawasaki ... GPZ 750 R1).
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Old 12-28-2013, 05:58 AM   #18
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I had to go across it a bunch of times while working on a sod-roofed house's water filtration system. They had troubles with California Condors tearing up their roof. There were motion triggered, Condor chasing, Rainbirds all over the place. We had to weave around trying to not get pegged by them.
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Old 01-26-2014, 02:01 AM   #19
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Sorry, Lamplighter, but the bridge is South of Carmel over Bixby Creek. Maybe there's another one up north, but this one is south, between Carmel and Big Sur.

Sexobon said: "I used to motorcycle across it on a fairly regular basis when I lived in Monterey. Great ride, really let the good times roll (yes, I rode a Kawasaki ... GPZ 750 R1). "

Ah, memories. I rode down Hwy 1 to Hearst's Castle (San Simeon) on the back of a motorcycle. Absolutely amazing ride. One of the most beautiful experiences I've had. And to think I rode the whole way without a helmet. It was before such things were insisted upon by all.

xoxoxoBruce said: "I wonder how many Redwoods died for that bridge?"

They may not have used redwoods. Just south of Carmel there is a huge, densely wooded canyon (Palo Canyon) and I'll bet that's where they got the trees.

When we explored the canyon we found signs of long-ago logging, bridges made of whole logs, ruins of cabins, lots of stumps and roads that were at one time clear for driving.

I don't remember what kind of trees were in the canyon . . . maybe they were redwoods, but it seems to me there were other trees in that area.

Just guessing, though.
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Old 01-26-2014, 02:03 AM   #20
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Here it is in the historical article you quoted.

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Large advertisements were placed in The Herald honoring Murphy's contribution. Its trucks were used to haul the Douglas fir from the railroad yards in Monterey to the bridge site and the company also supplied sand and gravel for the concrete from a plant in Big Sur. The road at the time was one-way with hairpin turns, making trips very dangerous for the drivers of large trucks.
So, I was wrong about the Palo Colorado Canyon trees. Wonder what that logging was for then?
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Old 01-26-2014, 12:54 PM   #21
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The cabins, maybe?
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Old 01-26-2014, 12:56 PM   #22
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Originally Posted by CaliforniaMama View Post
Wonder what that logging was for then?
Money.
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Old 01-27-2014, 01:10 AM   #23
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Redwood is a very soft wood. Not a lumber of choice for weight bearing, since fir is so much cheaper and stronger. Redwood is used for shingles, sidings, fencing and patios, etc., since it resists rot and bugs, similar to cedar, and inside it's a decorative wood paneling.

I've never seen redwood in the structural wood grade section of the lumber yard.
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Old 01-27-2014, 06:57 AM   #24
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I've never seen redwood in the structural wood grade section of the lumber yard.

We see it around Monterey all the time. The lumber yards all have whole sections dedicated to it. They usually call it "con heart" for construction heart wood. We pick it for things that we want a little less buggy but don't need fully treated wood. Most of my house is made out of redwood studs. All the siding too.
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Old 01-27-2014, 12:02 PM   #25
xoxoxoBruce
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Recycled Redwood, mostly from beams in demolished buildings, is available in 3 x 8,10,12;
4 x 8,10,12,14;
6 x 8,10,12,14;
8 x 8,10,12;
10 x 10,12;
12 x 12;
larger on request.
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