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-   -   What's making you happy today? (http://cellar.org/showthread.php?t=14055)

Sundae 09-26-2011 12:38 PM

A small happiness, but I di feel glad I did it.
Was talking over the weekend about blacberry & apple crumble
Mum has prepared and frozen a number of cooking apples she was given this year. I went out for 30 minutes and brought back a box of blackberries. The walk, the time-out and the general nature of... well, nature's bounty, has made me feel great.

And I think it cheered her up a bit.
I offered to soak them for her, but she was happy to do it. Off they go to the freezer to await happy dessert times.

I do have some itchy scratches though.

Flint 09-26-2011 05:24 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Clodfobble (Post 752483)
(We're also getting a free wireless printer out of the deal, but that's because Mr. Clod is like Flint when it comes to demanding excellent customer service. He stonewalled that warranty rep like a right rat bastard.)

The Flint and Pooka teamwork is what really gets things done: it's like good cop, bad cop, oh my God should we call the cops?

monster 09-27-2011 12:03 AM

apparently hebe's grades are awesome. Coming from hippie school, we've never had to deal with grades before. i still find the online grade check thing kinda voyeuristic, though, and tonight was surprised to learn that her grades were really good. I only just made the adjustment to what % = A from Brit to yank, so i guess I was overcompensating.

When I was at school, 70% was an A. here, that's a fail......

Griff 09-27-2011 06:32 AM

Good for her! Do you think the hippie school probably helped her become a creative problem solver?

monster 09-27-2011 08:06 AM

Some of that, for sure. Mostly I think it taught her that she's in charge of and responsible for her own education, so when she encounters something she doesn't know, she doesn't have the "nobody told me" or the "we didn't cover this yet" attitude that I've seen in some kids (and I guess been surprised by), and she doesn't rely on anyone to remind her when stuff is due.

They always tell us that the transition from the small, friendly, sheltered, co-operative school to the big competitive high schools is easy and Open School kids come out on top, but I guess we don't believe it 'til we see it.

I also didn't know that AC classes bump up theri grades, so the grades I'm seeing on powerschool are lower than her final grade will be for those classes if she keeps it up.

I'm just relieved that she's made the transition OK, that the intense swimming schedule is not affecting her grades and that she's getting the grades I hoped she would (better, even). It's all too easy for parents to overestimate their children's academic and multitasking abilities.

Clodfobble 09-27-2011 09:12 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by monster
Mostly I think it taught her that she's in charge of and responsible for her own education, so when she encounters something she doesn't know, she doesn't have the "nobody told me" or the "we didn't cover this yet" attitude that I've seen in some kids (and I guess been surprised by), and she doesn't rely on anyone to remind her when stuff is due.

This. The self-reliance thing is so important, and sadly is pretty much ignored by the public school system.

ZenGum 09-27-2011 09:38 PM

Aboslutely, I see first year uni students drowning because they lack this.

But when you link teacher's jobs and incomes to standardised test results, and then don't test for things like this ...

classicman 09-27-2011 10:03 PM

Not a teachers job to teach self-reliance. That is good parenting.

Aliantha 09-27-2011 10:09 PM

Zen, dazza tells me that he's noticing a growing number of students entering uni without the ability to write reports and things like that and who seem to expect the lecturer to practically write their papers for them. For example, he'll send them a web address to look for info, and they respond by asking for the exact link that corresponds to what they're doing.

This is a massive problem as I see it.

monster 09-27-2011 10:14 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ZenGum (Post 758975)
Aboslutely, I see first year uni students drowning because they lack this.

But when you link teacher's jobs and incomes to standardised test results, and then don't test for things like this ...

yeah it killed me last night to hear "your disabled/IEP students have to reach this % of reading and math proficiency for us to pass this test. if they don't, you're going to be seeing a lot more homework and your kids are going to be asked to stay after school and come in on Saturdays...." because that will really help. if they're not getting it, doing it more achieves nothing. you need to do it differently and that takes time. this is some crappy new measurement call Adequate Yearly Progress AYP Absolute Yard of Poop imo.

Aliantha 09-27-2011 10:19 PM

I think it depends what they're doing exactly. Sometimes repetition does help. Usually it should be a combination of things. It really depends if they're developing or consolidating knowledge. If they're just in the early stages of consolidating, they're likely to benefit from repetition.

I hope they can find a way to work towards helping all the kids. It's hard to tailor a solution individually if the parents aren't involved though thanks to the limited resources available to teachers.

classicman 09-27-2011 10:30 PM

Quote:

your disabled/IEP students have to reach this %
Yup. Been dealing with that for 2 years.
Me: He has virtually no short term memory. What are our alternatives?
Teach: Work harder, more homework, worksheets...
Me: He has NO memory! THAT is his disability.
Teach: your disabled/IEP students have to reach this %
Wash, rinse & repeat.

Aliantha 09-27-2011 10:39 PM

Sometimes in special circumstances you need to do the research yourself classic. See if you can find out what the alternatives are for yourself then teach the teacher, or at least give them the info you've found and discuss the practicalities, but seriously, no one teaches teachers what to do in every situation. Sometimes it's helpful to do a bit of the legwork yourself. Teachers just don't have enough time to do it all themselves, and even the ones who really do care don't have the time and often/usually no resources.

classicman 09-27-2011 10:43 PM

That is another story. We have gone far past this point. He is now in with a teacher who is much better for him and with him. Its been fantastic, honestly. There are still issues, but we discuss how to overcome them and we both have been innovative in our approach and united in the direction of the lessons. For this year (summer plus a month) its been a win/win/win.
Resources are basically all on me. That was fine when I had an income. Now its a little tougher, but we are still managing. I REALLY want to get him a tablet, but there is no way that is gonna happen till I find a new job.

monster 09-27-2011 10:44 PM

the point where they are sending the extra homework and scheduling extra classes is long after repetition has failed as a reinforcement tool.

And it's often not the best tool in the first place. But it is the easiest to administer, monitor and grade. And it does work for most, eventually. But not for all, and notably not for a lot of students with IEPs. that's kind of the point of IEPs, i thought, but apparently this stupidity trumps IEPs. MAKE IT SO!


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