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-   -   July 4, 2008: Friday Awwww (http://cellar.org/showthread.php?t=17628)

DanaC 07-04-2008 05:44 AM

Quote:

I'm curious. What IS the proper word for meat that we get from a rabbit? Deer is to venison what rabbit is to ????
Rabbit is just rabbit.

The reason deer meat is 'venison', cow meat is 'beef' and pig meat is 'pork' is that those were meats eaten by the higher echelons of society in the early middle ages. The higher echelons of society in early medieval England were Norman (i.e French) and they imported their words for those meats into our language. The meats eaten by the lower orders (the native english) retained their original English names. i.e chicken and rabbit.

Turkey was introduced later and was not of the anglo-french period.

sweetwater 07-04-2008 07:38 AM

Awwww.... but in my mind I am photoshopping some jackalope antlers on the rabbit.

footfootfoot 07-04-2008 08:09 AM

That explains where Jackalope come from!

Sundae 07-04-2008 08:09 AM

Interestingly - we call turkey, turkey because it came from Turk traders.

The French call it Dinde - as in Poisson D'Inde - literally Indian Chicken - because it was supposed to come from India.

The Dutch call it kalkoen, which is Dutch for Calicut, an Indian port - again where it was supposedly from.

And the Spanich word for turkey is pavo - which was originally a peacock (peacock is now pavo real).

Just a bit of Friday afternoon linguistics for you.

spudcon 07-04-2008 08:45 AM

I don't care what they call `em, just stuff `em in a blender and cook `em.

xoxoxoBruce 07-04-2008 11:19 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by spudcon (Post 466782)
I don't care what they call `em, just stuff `em in a Bass-O-Matic and cook `em.

Fixed it fer ya. ;)

spudcon 07-04-2008 03:29 PM

I stand corrected. Thank you Bruce.

newtimer 07-04-2008 10:10 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Sundae Girl (Post 466778)
...as in Poisson D'Inde - literally Indian Chicken...

That's "Indian fish" in French.

And I always thought turkeys were native to North America. What were they doing in Turkey and India? Next are you going to tell us that apple pie is really from Mozambique?

morethanpretty 07-05-2008 12:28 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by newtimer (Post 466900)
And I always thought turkeys were native to North America. What were they doing in Turkey and India? Next are you going to tell us that apple pie is really from Mozambique?

They are, its probably the trade route they came through.

xoxoxoBruce 07-05-2008 01:00 AM

Most of the early American pioneers had limited education, and couldn't spell Mozambique, so they changed it to apple. ;)

bluecuracao 07-05-2008 02:55 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by richlevy (Post 466733)
Don't worry. It's going to take some time to find a recipe that works for venison and rabbit.:D

Rosemary and garlic?

Ah, no time at all. My friend's restaurant in Philadelphia, Bistro 7, regularly features rabbit and venison on the menu. :drool:

xoxoxoBruce 07-05-2008 04:27 AM

I'll bet they're different recipes, though.

bluecuracao 07-05-2008 05:24 AM

Well, you're right.

spudcon 07-05-2008 07:06 AM

Put deer and rabbit parts in Bass-O-Matic, blend to lumpy mush, por into crock pot with one jar of grape jelly, cook overnight. feed it to the dog.

Sundae 07-05-2008 09:09 AM

1 Attachment(s)
There was a TV competition last year for The Great British Menu - each dish that won was served at the British Ambassador's Dinner in France.

The main course was a variation on Stargazy Pie made with rabbit and crayfish. So perhaps rabbit & venison are not such strange bedfellows.


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