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-   -   What's making you happy today? (http://cellar.org/showthread.php?t=14055)

DanaC 01-04-2009 07:22 AM

Of course she is, that's the law!

Sundae 01-04-2009 09:43 AM

Nah - pub deal, not a dedicated carvery.
Although I found a proper time-warp 70's-80's restaurant when I first lived in London called The Dolphin which still had tomato soup and prawn cocktail starters, full roast dinners and a sweet trolley. We ordered a bottle of Mattheus Rose to wash it down.

This was just a carvery. Pictures in the Aylesbury thread. It was lovely.
And my bro stopped by (the house) when we got back, which always makes me happy.

TheMercenary 01-04-2009 09:50 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Sundae Girl
We're going out for a pub lunch.
To a carvery!
It's all very retro, and very exciting.

If only my camera battery was charged.
I might make my Dad take his camera instead.
Time travelling is always worth a photo.

Quote:

Are you going to have Prawns Marie Rose for starters and black Forest Gateau for pud?
A carvery?

Prawns Marie Rose = Big shrimp cooked in wine?

black Forest Gateau?

pud?

Translate please.

A common people separated by language.

Sundae 01-04-2009 10:14 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by TheMercenary (Post 518865)
A carvery?

It's like a buffet formed of the constituents for a roast dinner.
You choose one of the meats - usually a choice of three or four.
The standards are pork/ lamb/ beef/ poultry plus one other.
They carve it, then you add your accompaniments from a selection.
This will include all the necessaries for the roasts on offer - yorkshire puddings (beef), crackling (pork), stuffing (poultry) and all the various condiments inc bread sauce, horseradish, mustard, apple sauce, cranberry sauce et al.

They used to be HUGE - both in popularity and selection, but now whole restaurants are not given over to them, only corners of pubs.
Quote:

Prawns Marie Rose = Big shrimp cooked in wine?
It's what we call a Prawn Cocktail. What you would call shrimp, in a sundae glass, on top of lettuce, drizzled with a seafood sauce and occasionally sprinkled with paprika. A '70s classic.
Quote:

black Forest Gateau?
Again, something on sweet (dessert) trolleys in childhood. Chocolate cake in three layers with black cherries and cream in between, topped with both and rolled in chocolate flakes. Usually served with single (pouring) cream.
Quote:

pud?
Pudding. Equals dessert.

To see a modern carvery, see the Aylesbury thread.
It's retro for us, and great fun.

TheMercenary 01-04-2009 10:32 AM

Sounds awesome. Makes me hungry thinking about it. Thanks for the explanation.

wolf 01-04-2009 11:16 AM

Okay, so I think I got it ...

A carvery = buffet that only consists of a carving station, where they don't let you go back in line as many times as you want.

Prawns Marie Rose = shrimp cocktail

black Forest Gateau = Schwarzwalderkirschtorte

pud = lump of pudding that's cooked along with the beef, mainly to keep it company. Can be awesome in it's yumminess, or horribly dry and tasteless. Originally popular in Yorkshire. Bears no relation to American Pudding, or that other thing that we call pud, which isn't a food but is often eaten.

Edit ... oh ... that pud is like our pudding. Now you're confusing me.

limey 01-04-2009 11:57 AM

Yorkshire pudding - make batter as for pancakes and then cook in a dish in a hot oven above the beef. Probably best not to open the door til it's done (about 20 minutes? Dana?)
Pudding - generic term for any dessert, particularly a dough-based one.

DanaC 01-04-2009 12:13 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by limey (Post 518898)
Yorkshire pudding - make batter as for pancakes and then cook in a dish in a hot oven above the beef. Probably best not to open the door til it's done (about 20 minutes? Dana?)
Pudding - generic term for any dessert, particularly a dough-based one.

Honestly? I have only ever had the courage to try doing Yorkshire puds from scratch a couple of times in life and they weren't pretty. I am a culinary coward. I stick with the Aunt Bessies. This fear of Yorkshire puds is an inherited one.


[eta] Now I have mad cravings for Toad in the Hole. I have no way of assuaging that craving without either a) making toad in the whole using ingredients bought atthe local shop - never gonna happen, or b) taking a chance with the Birds Eye frozen TitH - unwise.

TheMercenary 01-04-2009 12:25 PM

We had a roasted rack of beef and Yorkshire Pudding for X-mas dinner. It was fantastic.

We had Toad in the Hole at the pub next to the Westminster Cathedral when we visited London 2 years ago.

Trilby 01-04-2009 01:17 PM

this "retro roasted dinner" thing has made me realize that my very, very favorite restaurant and my very, very favorite meal is hopelessly retro.

The Pine Club: Filet mignon (med. rare), hash browns, fried onions, stewed tomatoes and salad with bleu cheese.

I am soooo fifties. But, man, I LOVE it.

ETA: no room for desert until much later. Then, CAKE.

limey 01-04-2009 01:46 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by DanaC (Post 518900)
Honestly? I have only ever had the courage to try doing Yorkshire puds from scratch a couple of times in life and they weren't pretty. I am a culinary coward. I stick with the Aunt Bessies. This fear of Yorkshire puds is an inherited one.


[eta] Now I have mad cravings for Toad in the Hole. I have no way of assuaging that craving without either a) making toad in the whole using ingredients bought atthe local shop - never gonna happen, or b) taking a chance with the Birds Eye frozen TitH - unwise.

Dana, it's so easy (and cheap cheap CHEAP)!! Don't listen to all that crap about leaving the batter to rest, or adding sparkling water or this or that type of flour (plain or self-raising will do) or any of that fancy Yorkshire folklore. 4 oz flour in a bowl, make as much of a dimple as you can in the flour and break one egg into it, using a fork start to mix the egg with the flour around it in ever increasing circles. Before it gets too sticky (still loads of flour around the edge of the bowl) bit by bit add half a pint of milk, stirring it in with more of the flour each time. If you mess up and get lumps, beat the crap out of it at the end - use a whisk or brute violence or both.
During this process you've started to roast your sausages in the oven in a little fat. When the batter is mixed turn the oven up (mark 8, 225 degrees), pour the batter over the sausages and slam back in the oven for 20-30 minutes. If you open the door too soon it'll flop a little - just don't tell your gran.
Or come and visit with SG and we'll have Yorkshire pud lessons (taught by a Londoner in Scotland) :p !

Sundae 01-04-2009 02:21 PM

1 Attachment(s)
Ah Limey, while I appreciate your intention, I believe people (previously women) are either born able to make yorkshires, or they're not.

My sister's second boyfriend was a chef, and he could make an eye watering yorkshire. None of us liked him, so we had to stop going to the carvery they both worked at when she took up with her current amour. To be fair she's now been married to him for sixteen years. I mourn those yorkshires though.

My Nan, despite all her other faults, culinary and otherwise, could also do the magic. No-one else I know can.

They should look more like the pic below, rather than the arid ones shown in the Aylesbury thread! BTW Dana - I gave up years ago and have used Aunt Bessies' every time too.

SteveDallas 01-04-2009 02:49 PM

I installed a stove and a dishwasher yesterday.

So far nothing has blown up or leaked. (I have some doubts about the dishwasher, but we'll see how it goes.)

Trilby 01-04-2009 03:10 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by SteveDallas (Post 518929)
I installed a stove and a dishwasher yesterday.

So far nothing has blown up or leaked. (I have some doubts about the dishwasher, but we'll see how it goes.)

I wish I had a man slave.

Dammit!

xoxoxoBruce 01-04-2009 05:00 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Brianna (Post 518933)
I wish I had a man slave.

Dammit!

What, and give the rest of them up? ;)


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