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lumberjim 07-31-2010 10:23 AM

The Power of Now
 
a Book by Echart Tolle

I'm reading this, and I can tell already that as soon as I finish, I'll be rereading it. I've hit several parts that I want to spend more time contemplating.

The concept of a Pain Body was very interesting....

Quote:

This accumulated pain is a negative energy field that occupies your body and mind. If you look on it as an invisible entity in its own right, you are getting qute close to the truth. It's the emotional pain body. It has two modes of being: dormant and active....
....The pain body wants to survive, just like every other entity in existance, and it can only survive if it gets you to unconsciously identify with it. It can then rise up, take you over, "become you," and live through you. It needs to get its "food" through you. It will feed on any experience that resonates with its own kind of energy, anything that creates further pain in whatever form: anger, destructiveness, hatred, grief, emotional drama, violence, and even illness.
So the pain body, when it has taken you over, will create a situation in your life that refects back its own energy frequency for it to feed on. Pain can only feed on pain. Pain cannot feed on joy. It finds it quite indigestible.

Once the pain body has taken you over, you want more pain. You become a victim or a perpetrator. You want to inflict pain, or you want to suffer pain, or both. There isen't really much difference between the two. You are not conscious of this, of course, and will vehemently claim that you do not want pain. But look closely and you will that your thinking and behavior are designed to keep the pain going, for yourself and others.
If you were truly conscious of it, the pattern would disolve, for to want more pain os insanity, and nobody is conscioulsy insane.
there are other very salient points in the book, and although it's a little weird... I think it's changing the way I see myself a little bit.

Pooka 07-31-2010 10:35 AM

Oh man... that is a wonderful book!! I've bought 5 copies and am always giving them away and findmyself buying another. That is awesome LJ!

Pooka 07-31-2010 10:40 AM

You might also want to check out The Peaceful Warrior by Dan Millman.

lumberjim 07-31-2010 10:41 AM

meant to tell you... my mom happened to have a copy of Loving What is. So that's on my list too. I'm finding out that there is a whole lot of shit I wasn't paying attention to, and a whole lot more stuff available to learn about.

Pooka 07-31-2010 10:52 AM

A wise man knows how little he knows ;-). I hope the book is as helpful for you as it was for me.

I just started reading a book called Women, Food and God by Greenen Roth and despite Women being in the title I can see how it would be valuable for anyone. It isn't a Christian self help book... the term "God" is used in a much broader sense. It talks about how what we put on our plates is key to our view on spirituality, ourselves... etc and key to identifying and healing whatever it is that causes us to eat (you could translate that into any distructive behavior as she points out) when we aren't hungry. It is facinating. I'm only about a 1/3 of the way through, but I have to recomend it as well... if you can get past the title.

lumberjim 07-31-2010 11:51 AM

RE: pain body
 
I've noticed before that when I feel sad or depressed, or jealous, or grief that I somehow want to continue. I don't want to be cheered up. I don't want to be mollified.

I always thought that maybe I had some defect that made me want to punish myself for something. Or some invisible compulsion that caused me to create situations that caused me to be in trouble.

Giving it a 'body' as Tolle does makes it possible to see it as separate from myself, and thus changeable. If it's not actually a part of me, then it's not me. It's just something I do. I can fix that when I notice myself doing it. Tolle promotes constant presence to watch for it. I'm not even close to that at this point... but I have been able, lately, to recognize when I'm allowing my current situation to spin my emotions up into knots. It's not easy, but if I concentrate, and breathe deeply for a few moments, I can bring myself out of the spiral of remorse for the past, and dread of the future... and dig my claws into the present moment. It's getting me through the day, at least.

lumberjim 07-31-2010 12:04 PM

I've spoken about something like it regarding anger to my son. When he gets mad, it takes over. The anger has control, and he gets lost in it. I can see it when it happens. I've told him to be aware of it... You never know if it's sticking, with a kid, but I hope it does, because this feels true to me.

squirell nutkin 07-31-2010 02:24 PM

Here's something to watch, instead of read. Take it with a grain of salt, it brings up interesting things to contemplate:
"What The Bleep Do We Know?"

I'd be curious to hear your thoughts on the movie's message.

Here's a clip about addiction:

HungLikeJesus 07-31-2010 05:17 PM

What do you mean by pain, LJ?

We need an operational definition.

lumberjim 07-31-2010 05:55 PM

In his book, Tolle defines it as any kind of negative emotion, or situation. Say....addiction...or jealousy.....

HungLikeJesus 07-31-2010 06:07 PM

If you enjoy pain, then it isn't negative.

If it isn't negative, then it isn't pain.

If it isn't pain, then you can't enjoy it.

It's very circular.

lumberjim 07-31-2010 06:33 PM

the point he makes is that the pain takes on it's own awareness, and controls you. the pain enjoys the pain. you don't.

squirell nutkin 07-31-2010 08:07 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by lumberjim (Post 673798)
the point he makes is that the pain takes on it's own awareness, and controls you. the pain enjoys the pain. you don't.

Yeah, that's essentially the point of that clip, except they throw a physiological spin on it: You become addicted to the neuro-chemicals produced by whatever mind state you are habitually in.

The more of the chemicals you produce, the more receptor sites are created...

skysidhe 08-02-2010 01:34 AM

what sn said

casimendocina 08-02-2010 06:57 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by lumberjim (Post 673715)

Giving it a 'body' as Tolle does makes it possible to see it as separate from myself, and thus changeable. If it's not actually a part of me, then it's not me. It's just something I do. I can fix that when I notice myself doing it. Tolle promotes constant presence to watch for it.

Check out Russ Harris who does mindfulness stuff-works well for separating stuff out.

I don't know a lot about it, but mindfulness seems to be based on Vipassana meditation. I've read some stuff ("Monsoon Rains and Icicle Drops" + "Thirty Something and Over it") about 10 day workshops in Europe and Australia. From what I can work out, on the very limited research I've done, the mindfulness stuff seems like the 'lite' version of Vipassana, but if the thought of 10 straight days of meditation seems impossible, then mindfulness might be the way to build up the skill before going for the 10 day sink or swim workshop.

Pooka 08-02-2010 08:19 AM

LJ if you want to watch What the Bleep do We Know... I think I still have a copy somewhere... I'd be happy to send it... it is a bit hokey at times, but makes some useful points. Let me know and I'll pop it in the mail to you.

lumberjim 08-14-2010 12:03 PM

just listen. don't stare at the screen.








lumberjim 08-14-2010 12:24 PM



this is part 2, but the first 3/4 of part 1 is a some old lady with a guitar, and a brief intro. He begins this clip talking about HOW to be present at the venue he is speaking in.
hang in there, it takes him a while to get going...

lumberjim 08-21-2010 11:12 PM

I found the text version ofThe Power of Now on pfd


HungLikeJesus 08-22-2010 11:36 AM

Personal Flotation Device?

Cloud 08-22-2010 11:47 AM

LJ, you amaze me, sometimes. in a good way.

Pico and ME 08-22-2010 11:50 AM

He has a wonderful way with free association, doesn't he.

Edit: Oops, I thought you meant HLJ.

casimendocina 08-23-2010 06:58 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Pico and ME (Post 678080)
He has a wonderful way with free association, doesn't he.

Edit: Oops, I thought you meant HLJ.

I've got the monopoly on that. I call it linking.:D

Pico and ME 08-23-2010 07:06 AM

Lol...I call it surfing.

skysidhe 08-24-2010 01:18 AM

He hurts my pain body.

Just kidding.

I browsed his online book once. He makes some good points. I am glad he is helping you.

Griff 08-24-2010 07:40 AM

He really has a good synthesis of a lot of spiritual thought. I liked this especially:
The reason why some people love to engage in dangerous activities, such as mountain climbing, car racing, and so on, although they may not be aware of it, is that it forces them into the Now -- that intensely alive state that is free of time, free of problems, free of thinking, free of the burden of the personality.
This really resonates with me. I've often felt compelled to escape into this sort of activity. When you find the flow there is such quietude. I sometimes wondered if I was somehow self-destructive but this is a better interpretation. Downhill skiing, mountain biking, and fencing have all provided unmeasured time of absolute stillness. It can also be found putting a chisel to wood or sitting, but that is much much harder. This is the peace we find without a church growing our "pain body". He may be a kook but he is a kook for the good.

lumberjim 08-27-2010 12:01 PM

Quote:

Salvation is not elsewhere in place or time. It is here and now.

What does that statement mean, "salvation is here and now"? I don't understand it. I don't even know what salvation means.

Most people pursue physical pleasures or various forms of psychological gratification because they believe that those things will make them happy or free them from a feeling of fear or lack. Happiness may be perceived as a heightened sense of aliveness attained through physical pleasure, or a more secure and more complete sense of self attained through some form of psychological gratification. This is the search for salvation from a state of unsatisfactoriness or insufficiency. Invariably, any satisfaction that they obtain is short-lived, so the condition of satisfaction or fulfillment is usually projected once again onto an imaginary point away from the here and now. "When I obtain this or am free of that - then I will be okay." This is the unconscious mind-set that creates the illusion of salvation in the future.
True salvation is fulfillment, peace, life in all its fullness. It is to be who you are, to feel within you the good that has no opposite, the joy of Being that depends on nothing outside itself. It is felt not as a passing experience but as an abiding presence. In theistic language, it is to "know God" - not as something outside you but as your own innermost essence. True salvation is to know yourself as an inseparable part of the timeless and formless One Life from which all that exists derives its being.

True salvation is a state of freedom - from fear, from suffering, from a perceived state of lack and insufficiency and therefore from all wanting, needing, grasping, and clinging. It is freedom from compulsive thinking, from negativity, and above all from past and future as a psychological need. Your mind is telling you that you cannot get there from here. Something needs to happen, or you need to become this or that before you can be free and fulfilled. It is saying, in fact, that you need time - that you need to find, sort out, do, achieve, acquire, become, or understand something before you can be free or complete. You see time as the means to salvation, whereas in truth it is the greatest obstacle to salvation. You think that you can't get there from where and who you are at this moment because you are not yet complete or good enough, but the truth is that here and now is the only point from where you can get there. You "get' there by realizing that you are there already. You find God the moment you realize that you don't need to seek God. So there is no only way to salvation: Any condition can be used, but no particular condition is needed. However, there is only one point of access: the Now.

lumberjim 06-12-2019 09:24 AM

END THE DELUSION OF TIME
It seems almost impossible to disidentify from the mind. We are all immersed in it. How do you teach a fish to fly?
Here is the key. End the delusion of time. Time and mind are inseparable. Remove time from the mind and it stops - unless you choose to use it.
To be identified with your mind is to be trapped in time: the compulsion to live almost exclusively through memory and anticipation. This creates an endless preoccupation with past and future and an unwillingness to honor and acknowledge the present moment and allow it to be. The compulsion arises because the past gives you an identity and the future holds the promise of salvation, of fulfillment in whatever form. Both are illusions.
But without a sense of time, how would we function in this world? There would be no goals to strive toward anymore. I wouldn't even know who I am, because my past makes me who I am today. I think time is something very precious, and we need to learn to use it wisely rather than waste it.

Time isn't precious at all, because it is an illusion. What you perceive as precious is not time but the one point that is out of time: the Now. That is precious indeed. The more you are focused on time - past and future - the more you miss the Now, the most precious thing there is.

Why is it the most precious thing? Firstly, because it is the only thing. It's all there is. The eternal present is the space within which your whole life unfolds, the one factor that remains constant. Life is now. There was never a time when your life was not now, nor will there ever be. Secondly, the Now is the only point that can take you beyond the limited confines of the mind. It is your only point of access into the timeless and formless realm of Being.

NOTHING EXISTS OUTSIDE THE NOW
'Aren't past and future just as real, sometimes even more real, than the present? After all, the past determines who we are, as well as how we perceive and behave in the present. And our future goals determine which actions we take in the present.'

You haven't yet grasped the essence of what I am saying because you are trying to understand it mentally. The mind cannot understand this. Only you can. Please just listen.
Have you ever experienced, done, thought, or felt anything outside the Now? Do you think you ever will? Is it possible for anything to happen or be outside the Now? The answer is obvious, is it not?
Nothing ever happened in the past; it happened in the Now. Nothing will ever happen in the future; it will happen in the Now. What you think of as the past is a memory trace, stored in the mind, of a former Now. When you remember the past, you reactivate a memory trace - and you do so now. The future is an imagined Now, a projection of the mind. When the future comes, it comes as the Now. When you think about the future, you do it now. Past and future obviously have no reality of their own. Just as the moon has no light of its own, but can only reflect the light of the sun, so are past and future only pale reflections of the light, power, and reality of the eternal present. Their reality is "borrowed" from the Now.
The essence of what I am saying here cannot be understood by the mind. The moment you grasp it, there is a shift in consciousness from mind to Being, from time to presence. Suddenly, everything feels alive, radiates energy, emanates Being.

xoxoxoBruce 06-13-2019 02:11 AM

The now is perfectly fine for the hermit, but being aware of time is necessary to mesh with others, with society. Who hasn't said I was so intrigued/entertained/engrossed I lost track of time. Fun for you but annoying to people relying on you, or to yourself if there's other things you want to accomplish.

OK, all that was the train of though responding to the word Time.
---------------------------------------------------------------
The word Now, as live in the now, do it now, is plastic, always in context.

Don't wait until you're 60 to start saving for retirement, do it now.
If we don't leave now, we'll be late for the curtain.
Rather than trimming those bushes in the fall, I should do it now.

Those are three distinctly different nows, and that muddies the issue.

lumberjim 06-13-2019 04:31 AM

They are not different. All 3 examples you gave could be stated substituting the word, immediately.

Of course you will leave now. All action takes place now. You may be misaligned with clock time, and be early or late to a meeting that was planned for a particular time, but when you arrive, it will be now.

Which speaks to the first section of your reply. Clock time is a useful thing. It's different than psychological time. I have to leave here at 10 am today to be on time. But if I sat here imagining what it will be like to get ready and go the whole time, then I would be missing.... Not be present... In all that now between.

Feel me?

xoxoxoBruce 06-13-2019 07:50 AM

You can call the present, now, but you're severely limiting your ability to communicate accurately in English. In the three examples I gave the word now represents three different spans of the future to any normal(or slightly warped) person. I believe I understand the concept, but trying to communicate it using now is like George Washington coming in a time machine and telling everyone he's gay.

lumberjim 06-13-2019 08:47 AM

How could the word now represent a span of time in the future? In all 3 examples, the now was the beginning of the task. It's just 3 different lengths of time from that point forward.

Maybe re read what I posted from the book where he talks about nothing ever happening in the future.

Now is now. The eternal present.

xoxoxoBruce 06-13-2019 03:38 PM

Only considering now is like being glued to your phone. Then you get run over by a bus, or walk off a pier. It's abdicating any and all responsibility for what happens to you. Replacing "I should have seen that coming" with "Shit happens".

sexobon 06-13-2019 06:53 PM

Him living in the Now could be advantagious for us, like:

What? You say today's your birthday! If you had been thinking ahead, I would've known sooner to get you a birthday present. But it's too late NOW! :p:

lumberjim 06-16-2019 06:15 PM

Of course you don't live ONLY in the moment. Just that your brain is a tool. It's not WHO you are.

You don't hold a hammer in your hand all day just in case you encounter a nail. So why is your brain always yapping away? Put it the fuck down when you don't need it.

You need to visualize the future in order to plan. You need to remember the past in order to learn. But you absolutely cannot live in either place. You're alive NOW. So when you've made your plan, set it gently aside and give your full attention to the task at hand. Repeat until the plan has come to fruition.


The point is to silence the narrative of thoughts that constantly run through your mind, taking your attention away from what you are doing.

That's what I'm trying to do. That helps me.

It's not easy. You have to catch yourself all day long. Even folding laundry, or mowing the lawn... Your mind races. Notice. Pay attention to what you're doing.

xoxoxoBruce 06-16-2019 11:42 PM

I always figured those mind numbing jobs like mowing the lawn were an opportunity to think about other things... like the babe in the house. ;)

lumberjim 06-17-2019 01:14 PM

They are just that. And I'm suggesting that when your attention is off (in the future) with the babe in the house, you're missing the moment you're in. Which one is real?

Gravdigr 06-17-2019 01:27 PM

I'm mowing the yard when there's a babe in the house?!

:smack:

Undertoad 06-17-2019 08:33 PM

Making music forces you into the now

I enjoy doing pit bands for musicals. For two hours, every note is planned out, and so from the first note you play, your mind is sharply focused on that. The only thought permitted is, what note do I play next, and when exactly do I play it. (After 1/32nd of a beat, or do I get to wait longer?)

Is this part of the point of meditation? To put yourself into that state, without depending on giving your brain another task to accomplish

xoxoxoBruce 06-18-2019 12:20 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by lumberjim (Post 1034290)
They are just that. And I'm suggesting that when your attention is off (in the future) with the babe in the house, you're missing the moment you're in. Which one is real?

After 40 years of spending a half dozen hours every week mowing the lawn, I'd rather be anywhere else. Why suffer through it when I can make it more pleasurable in my head? If I'm enjoying what I'm doing, or at least getting some satisfaction from it, I have no trouble staying in the moment. I doubt you had any trouble paying attention building your bike.

Perhaps lawn mowing was not the best choice for illustration because I hate it with an irrational pasion. I can see where multi-tasking can make things more work than pleasure by having to concentrate on not putting the cookie sheet in the washer, laundry in the crib, or the baby in the oven.

Griff 06-18-2019 06:21 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Undertoad (Post 1034329)
Making music forces you into the now

I enjoy doing pit bands for musicals. For two hours, every note is planned out, and so from the first note you play, your mind is sharply focused on that. The only thought permitted is, what note do I play next, and when exactly do I play it. (After 1/32nd of a beat, or do I get to wait longer?)

Is this part of the point of meditation? To put yourself into that state, without depending on giving your brain another task to accomplish

This is insight. Thank you.

lumberjim 06-18-2019 06:59 AM

I don't really know if I'd call it meditation, ute. What you describe sounds like you're just busy.

Meditation... As I understand it, is to practice simply quieting the mind. To not think in words for a time. It's very difficult at first.

You're not spaced out thinking about how beautiful a flower is, you're actually very alert. When no thoughts are speaking in your head, your other senses deliver a lot more information.

Seeing a flower without trying to name it, or judge it's beauty relative to other flowers (substitute any object). Trying not to see your memory of what that object is, but to be aware of it and the space it takes in the space near you. Feel it, don't interpret it. Hard to put words about not using words together.

The focus on the present moment is just an entry point to that state. Like being a cat, watching a mouse hole. And it really doesn't inhibit your ability to be engaged in your activity. But practicing doing it helps to alert you to your mind or ego taking over in daily life.

Like, when you get mad at someone, and you start imagining what you're going to say to them to make them see their error. You start holding the conversation, playing both roles, in your head. You can get pretty far from the reality of the situation that way.

But if you've practiced being present, it's easier to catch yourself enjoying that inner argument, and recognizing that it's your egoic mind flexing it's muscles, not your being. That being is made of the same things as the opponent, and you can accept that they DID say that thing that angered you and not get twisted up wishing they hadn't or imagining what they'll say next. You can see why it angered you and that you are not the anger, so coming back to your calm demeanor is much easier. You don't give the opponent a wall to smash their anger against, so the confrontation ends immediately.

limey 06-18-2019 09:33 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Undertoad (Post 1034329)
Making music forces you into the now

I enjoy doing pit bands for musicals. For two hours, every note is planned out, and so from the first note you play, your mind is sharply focused on that. The only thought permitted is, what note do I play next, and when exactly do I play it. (After 1/32nd of a beat, or do I get to wait longer?)

Is this part of the point of meditation? To put yourself into that state, without depending on giving your brain another task to accomplish

This is why going to any music practice is a restorative action for me. All other thoughts and feelings are put away for the duration of the practice.
I disagree with LJ that it is another form of busyness because UT here is having to put the immersion into the now that is a music practice (or performance) into words, just like LJ is trying to describe meditation.

Sent by magick

Undertoad 06-18-2019 09:54 AM

It's not exactly like being busy! There is something about the timing aspect of it, and the fact that you're working with other people. Every BEAT forces you into the current time.

I'm singing now, and singing and playing bass is an amazing challenge. I feel like my brain is entirely taken up by it; and I have to reach some sort of spiritual other world, where I can access both things at once.

lumberjim 06-18-2019 04:41 PM

Try meditating in the morning. You may find that it enhances that ability. Like exercising your being. Music is guttural. You feel it more than think it. Dancing is the same. If you think, you slip.

lumberjim 06-18-2019 04:43 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by limey (Post 1034362)
This is why going to any music practice is a restorative action for me. All other thoughts and feelings are put away for the duration of the practice.
I disagree with LJ that it is another form of busyness because UT here is having to put the immersion into the now that is a music practice (or performance) into words, just like LJ is trying to describe meditation.

Sent by magick

Sounds right. I was thinking he said that his mind was so active concentrating in each note, it was simply occupied. His second explanation clarified a bit more.

xoxoxoBruce 06-18-2019 11:03 PM

Trying to force you mind to idle, if not stop, is an unnatural experience, that only happens normally when you die. Even sleeping, or in a coma, your brain is cooking, often full tilt boogie.

limey 06-19-2019 01:30 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Undertoad (Post 1034368)
It's not exactly like being busy! There is something about the timing aspect of it, and the fact that you're working with other people. Every BEAT forces you into the current time.

Yes, this.
Quote:

I'm singing now, and singing and playing bass is an amazing challenge. I feel like my brain is entirely taken up by it; and I have to reach some sort of spiritual other world, where I can access both things at once.
Kudos, man!

Griff 06-19-2019 06:29 AM

I believe you guys are describing the flow state. I've entered it when mountain biking, long ago building the timber frame, and very rarely when I used to fence. I can only dream of this kind of immersion in music, it must be transcendent. It's especially interesting in music because the minds perception of time passing is altered but timing is perfected.

lumberjim 06-19-2019 07:38 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by xoxoxoBruce (Post 1034404)
Trying to force you mind to idle, if not stop, is an unnatural experience, that only happens normally when you die. Even sleeping, or in a coma, your brain is cooking, often full tilt boogie.

It's not unnatural, just unfamiliar. The vast majority of people never stop thinking and imagining. That's normal. It's also insane.

To be constantly talked to from inside your own head. If you were to vocalize all of your thoughts... Or if everyone could hear the voice in your head, you'd get locked up for your own protection. To have the ability to put the voice on pause and give yourself a moment's peace is a skill that you have to practice. But first you have to want to. Your ego... The person you present to the world and yourself resists it. Comes up with a lot of reasons why it's a bad idea to not think. Once you get a real taste, I promise you'll want another. And it gets easier to do the more you try.

You are challenging these things I say in this thread. I expect that it's because it doesn't ring true for you. Or you're doing me the favor of playing the straight man because you're a really really good guy and your thoughts run deep. I prefer to believe the latter. And thank you, keep arguing.

I'm not identified with this idea to the point where if I'm proven wrong, I will feel defeated or diminished. This is about personal experience, so all we can really do is share our own biased perceptions with each other and try to convey the feeling using limiting words and mental imagery.

lumberjim 06-19-2019 12:38 PM


Gravdigr 06-19-2019 01:12 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Undertoad (Post 1034368)
...singing and playing bass is an amazing challenge...

Musical buddy says that's the hardest thing he does as a musician. He's usually rhythm and lead singer. He says bass and singing lead is much harder for him.

lumberjim 06-19-2019 01:49 PM


Undertoad 06-19-2019 02:10 PM

Quote:

bass and singing lead is much harder
Now add to that, calculating the low harmony on the fly!

It's amazing. And the guys ask me to do harmonies on early Beatles, but no way. I can't play something like "Day Tripper" and sing harmony at the same time. The rhythm of bass makes it really wildly hard to do, depending on the song. Paul is a stone-cold goddamn genius.

I now sing lead on "Black Water" and it is okay because the bass part is simple. And at times it doesn't even happen, on the intro and the a capella section.

limey 06-19-2019 04:21 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Undertoad (Post 1034441)
Now add to that, calculating the low harmony on the fly!

It's amazing. And the guys ask me to do harmonies on early Beatles, but no way. I can't play something like "Day Tripper" and sing harmony at the same time. The rhythm of bass makes it really wildly hard to do, depending on the song. Paul is a stone-cold goddamn genius.

I now sing lead on "Black Water" and it is okay because the bass part is simple. And at times it doesn't even happen, on the intro and the a capella section.

WTG UT!

Sent by magick

lumberjim 06-19-2019 06:31 PM

I always marveled at Jimi Hendrix. He played intricate leads and sang at the same time. Probably akin to your experience with the bass line.

You must need two minds to do that. One to remember the words, and one to communicate the music through the instrument.

I posit that the thinking mind, or ego, handles the singing, while the being self generates the music.

Both minds are useful. The thinking mind is just much more dominant in most people. You may have found your entry point into inner peace.

I'm sharing all this here, risking ridicule (because I know you're all good folks and my friends... So not much of a risk) in the hope that this idea will spread into your lives and give you the sense of calm I have these recent days. And for myself to refer back to when it slips away from me again. I started this thread 9 years ago. In my last crisis.

Good to know it's there when I need it, and the overreaching message has stayed with me in my approach to life and it's challenges.... But I've been lax in exercising. Both in mind and body.

Shit happens. I forgive me. I have it in focus now. I'm down about 35 lbs and that's a start.

Next thing is to quit smoking.

Gravdigr 06-19-2019 07:55 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by lumberjim (Post 1034448)
...risking ridicule...So not much of a risk...

Something something:mock:

Something somehting:nadkick:


:p::p::p:

Undertoad 06-19-2019 08:18 PM


Undertoad 06-19-2019 09:02 PM

this is good stuff

lumberjim 06-19-2019 11:54 PM

Real good


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