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   Undertoad  Friday Aug 10 08:32 AM

August 10, 2007: Stuck hummingbird



EHOWA is rarely linked by IotD but here's an interesting one. xoB finds this item of a hummingbird who was forced to remain motionless for the pics... when it got caught in a spider web. The full story from the photographer:

Quote:
I took these while in California back in June. The humming bird was bouncing around up in the loft in the first pic like a fly on a window. I went up with a laundry basket and a towel to try to catch him, I was trying to trap him in the skylight on the right and then he just kind of stopped on the left and hovered there. Not like they normally hover, he was stuck in this bigass spider web. The bird was totally calm and totally stuck also. I trapped him in a towel and spent about 5 minutes plucking the web off of his wings. After I got all of the crap off, I gave him to my daughter to let go. He's still out there somewhere...







xoxoxoBruce  Friday Aug 10 08:39 AM

I'd guess that if the Hummer was outside it would easily fly through a web. But hovering up against the skylight, with no momentum, it just got more tangled and more tired.



Savannh  Friday Aug 10 10:13 AM

Aww... I'm glad this had a happy ending. My favourite birds, bar none. I love sitting in the back yard, and being visited by the hummers as they check out my plants.



Rexmons  Friday Aug 10 10:39 AM

hummers are my favorite too



Shawnee123  Friday Aug 10 10:42 AM

lol @ rex.

I've been trying to lure hummingbirds to my feeder all summer. No luck.



Silazius  Friday Aug 10 10:58 AM

I'll have a breast...and a wing and thigh and leg--they are kinda small.



runswithknives  Friday Aug 10 01:25 PM

Is it just me or are those little girls hands kinda beefy?



Sarasvati48  Friday Aug 10 02:39 PM

Spider webs

No, a hummingbird cannot fly easily thru a spider web. Spiders catch hummers all the time. Webs have the tensial strength of steel. I'm sure there are plenty of pics on the web of hummers being eaten by spiders...



xoxoxoBruce  Friday Aug 10 03:57 PM

Really? I've never seen one of those pictures. We did have pictures, that a member took and posted, of a hummer being caught and eaten by a Praying Mantis.

Tensile strength of steel means nothing but the resistance to breaking with a steady straight line pull. Any vector from that state, such as shearing, all bets are off. Also, in order to have a tensile pull, the thread must be firmly attached. In the case of spider webs, it would depend on glue being stronger than the web.

The success of webs is dependent on the speed of the spiders attack. Larger insects and bees, routinely escape from webs, if the spider isn't available or fast enough.



Shawnee123  Friday Aug 10 04:06 PM

oh crap i just tried to google "spider eating hummingbird" but i couldn't bear to look at the spider pics.



xoxoxoBruce  Friday Aug 10 04:43 PM

Well, I found one that was labeled a tarantula eating a humming bird but the picture shows it's actually a frog of some sort.
Hell, there are spiders big enough to eat chickens, but catching them in a web, is quite another matter.



Dypok  Friday Aug 10 10:29 PM

Goliath Bird Eating Spider, I think the largest species of spider in the world.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bird_eating_spider

Edit: Oh Jesus, don't stray far from that page. The pics are shivers on a stick.



xoxoxoBruce  Saturday Aug 11 12:03 AM

Yeah, that's the one I saw the picture of eating the frog. Camel spiders are huge too, but thankfully, neither builds webs.



morie  Saturday Aug 11 01:18 AM

yeah, and the spider's probably thinking, "Son of a bitch; just when I thought I had lunch ready."



richlevy  Saturday Aug 11 06:17 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dypok View Post
Goliath Bird Eating Spider, I think the largest species of spider in the world.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bird_eating_spider

Edit: Oh Jesus, don't stray far from that page. The pics are shivers on a stick.
Thanks for the link. I learned some interesting stuff.

Cause and effect, anyone?

Quote:
Males die soon after maturity and have a lifespan of 3 to 6 years.
Quote:
Male birdeaters are one of the few tarantula species to lack tibial spurs, located on the first pair of legs of most adult male tarantula species. These spurs are used by other tarantulas to keep the fangs of the female immobilized during mating so the female doesn't eat the male.



wolf  Saturday Aug 11 09:30 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dypok View Post
Edit: Oh Jesus, don't stray far from that page. The pics are shivers on a stick.
Kinda pretty if you don't have to get near them.


Boo_Dreadly  Sunday Aug 12 10:41 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by Rexmons View Post
hummers are my favorite too



SeanAhern  Friday Aug 17 01:11 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by xoxoxoBruce View Post
Tensile strength of steel means nothing but the resistance to breaking with a steady straight line pull. Any vector from that state, such as shearing, all bets are off.
True. But with a spider web, any force on it is going to turn into a tensile force pretty much immediately. To shear a spider web strand, you'd have to have some way to keep the strand pointed one direction while applying force in another. Since the strand is, for all intents and purposes, a 1-dimensional object, it's going to be pulled parallel to your force vector immediately and your force will become purely tensile.

Quote:
Originally Posted by xoxoxoBruce View Post
Also, in order to have a tensile pull, the thread must be firmly attached. In the case of spider webs, it would depend on glue being stronger than the web.
Now that's interesting. Given a force upon a single spider web strand, what is the material that holds it to the tree/brick/wall/branch that it's attached to? And what is that material's tensile strength? If it's knotted and twisted web strands, we're back to the tensile strength issue. If it's something else (glue?), we have a new set of possible failure modes.

Interestingly enough, there are types of steel that are stronger than spider web. Piano wire, for instance. See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tensile...sile_strengths.


xoxoxoBruce  Friday Aug 17 01:27 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by SeanAhern View Post
True. But with a spider web, any force on it is going to turn into a tensile force pretty much immediately. To shear a spider web strand, you'd have to have some way to keep the strand pointed one direction while applying force in another. Since the strand is, for all intents and purposes, a 1-dimensional object, it's going to be pulled parallel to your force vector immediately and your force will become purely tensile.
Yes, but we weren't talking about the pictures. Sarasvati48 was questioning my statement;
Quote:
I'd guess that if the Hummer was outside it would easily fly through a web. But hovering up against the skylight, with no momentum, it just got more tangled and more tired.



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