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   xoxoxoBruce  Saturday Dec 22 11:26 AM

December 22, 2007: Pub in a Tree

From the Daily Mail, via Neatorama.


Quote:
This bar in the trunk of a Baobab has punters travelling from miles around for a brew.
It has been created in a huge 72ft high tree in this garden in Limpopo, South Africa, to keep thirsty locals happy.
But tourists flock to see the amazing bar inside the hollow 155ft circumference of the trunk.
The tree even has its own cellar, with natural ventilation to keep the beer cool.
The huge tree, in the grounds of Sunland Farm, is so wide it takes 40 adults with outstretched arms to encircle it.
Carbon-dating, which can determine the age of organic materials, has shown the anicent tree is about 6,000 years old. "This tree is likely to be older than the Giza Pyramids of Egypt," said Heather van Heerden, owner of Sunland Farm.
"It is phenomenal to have such a magnificent tree in your back garden. It is possibly the biggest living thing on earth."
Pass out drunk and wake up in Alice's rabbit hole... or a Hobbit house.


aero geek  Saturday Dec 22 11:48 AM

quote: "has punters travelling from miles around.."

Must be referring to Zen and Shawnee :p



TheMercenary  Saturday Dec 22 11:52 AM

Very cool.

"Punter", what the hell is that? A kicker who punts the ball?



xoxoxoBruce  Saturday Dec 22 12:15 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by aero geek View Post
quote: "has punters travelling from miles around.."

Must be referring to Zen and Shawnee :p
I've a feeling you'll be pun-ished for that remark.


LJ  Saturday Dec 22 12:34 PM

a punt is a small boat.....



xoxoxoBruce  Saturday Dec 22 12:40 PM

Quote:
punter...... Noun. Generally a customer of any business. {Informal}
from


Sperlock  Saturday Dec 22 12:51 PM

Maybe this is what the Inn of the Last Home should have done.

Sorry, my geek is showing.



Trilby  Saturday Dec 22 02:36 PM

reminds me of the tree/hide-out where Wesley from the Princess Bride was tortured.


...Now, this is for posterity, so, please, be honest...



tulzscha  Saturday Dec 22 04:48 PM

Six thousand years old? That would make it the oldest living organism on the planet, considering bristlecone pines (the acknowledged record-holders) live to ~5,000.

Aha! after a little research (wikipedia) we find that:

Quote:
Some are reputed to be many thousands of years old, though as the wood does not produce annual growth rings, this is impossible to verify; few botanists give any credence to these claims of extreme age, with current evidence suggesting they rarely exceed 400 years old.
Also, how do you radiocarbon-date something that's still alive? Traditionally, it has to die first to stop taking in carbon-14, then you can calculate based on the remaining amount of the radioactive...

They're embellishing to snare tourists, aren't they? :P


monster  Saturday Dec 22 04:55 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by tulzscha View Post
Also, how do you radiocarbon-date something that's still alive?
Cut a bit off? Unless it's a worm or a zombie.....


Aliantha  Saturday Dec 22 06:29 PM

Over here, punters are the people who place bets at the races or the TAB, but it's also used as a friendly term for anyone playing any game of chance.



tulzscha  Saturday Dec 22 06:43 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by monster View Post
Cut a bit off? Unless it's a worm or a zombie.....
Hmm, but you have to find the right bit to cut off. If you get the wrong bit, it'll tell you it was born yesterday =]


sandypossum  Saturday Dec 22 06:57 PM

We have similar trees in Australia, the boab (Adansonia gregorii). There is a huge one near Derby in WA that is 1500 years old with a 15m girth. Alas ours was used as a stopover prison, mainly for Aborigines.




xoxoxoBruce  Saturday Dec 22 09:01 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by tulzscha View Post
Also, how do you radiocarbon-date something that's still alive? Traditionally, it has to die first to stop taking in carbon-14, then you can calculate based on the remaining amount of the radioactive...
They all grow solid, the center rots out at some point, and the hollow has to be cleaned out by people or critters. I should guess that center dead wood could be carbon dated, not to the age of the tree, but the point the center rotted out.


sweetwater  Saturday Dec 22 09:23 PM

suppose the tree pub sells root beer?



eander315  Saturday Dec 22 09:50 PM

"It is possibly the biggest living thing on earth."

It's possible, but not very likely:

Quote:
Excluding multi-stem trees, the General Sherman tree, an individual Giant Sequoia with a volume of 1487 m³, would hold the title of the world's largest living organism, if measured in volume and mass.[3] This tree stands 83.8 m (274 ft 11 in) tall and the trunk alone is estimated to weigh over 2000 tons. (Wikipedia)



xoxoxoBruce  Saturday Dec 22 10:25 PM

Welcome to the Cellar eander315.

I've read that claim, largest living thing, about a number of things. The trouble is, it's almost impossible to prove, because they're comparing apples and oranges... and pomegranates, and rutabagas, etc.



ZenGum  Sunday Dec 23 04:48 AM

I'm not as trunk as you dhink I am.



TheMercenary  Sunday Dec 23 08:13 AM

Quote:
Originally Posted by xoxoxoBruce View Post
Welcome to the Cellar eander315.

I've read that claim, largest living thing, about a number of things.
Yea, just ask LJ.


monster  Sunday Dec 23 12:34 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by tulzscha View Post
Hmm, but you have to find the right bit to cut off. If you get the wrong bit, it'll tell you it was born yesterday =]

Really? I make new cells every day, but my body looks distinctly 37 all over. Minimum. Wouldn't the movement of the sap ensure a similar effect? can you only carbondate the very center of a tree to get the true age? 'Cause if so, we'll never know, even when it's very, very dead.

Punters are customers to a Brit.


nil_orally  Sunday Dec 23 11:53 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by eander315 View Post
"It is possibly the biggest living thing on earth."

It's possible, but not very likely:
*thinks* mmm. Must upload picture of ex-wife to wikipedia


bigw00dy  Monday Dec 24 06:43 AM

Quote:
The tree even has its own cellar
Hey, so do we!!!!


Gravdigr  Monday Dec 24 01:00 PM

Concerning the "largest living thing on earth"...

I remember reading a few years ago about a fungus that was found in Wisconsin (I think) that covered (above and below ground) something like over 400 acres. One continuous (contiguous?) fungus type thingy. But, I guess it's all in how you measure "the largest living thing on earth".



Karenv  Tuesday Dec 25 12:47 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by Gravdigr View Post
Concerning the "largest living thing on earth"...

I remember reading a few years ago about a fungus that was found in Wisconsin (I think) that covered (above and below ground) something like over 400 acres. One continuous (contiguous?) fungus type thingy. But, I guess it's all in how you measure "the largest living thing on earth".
There is an armillaria fungus in the Malheur Forest in Oregon that is bigger than the armillaria fungus in the Great North Woods at an estimated 2,200 acres. Hard to measure though, as it is mostly underground. (Mycelium is the fungus, the mushrooms are like fruit.) Apples and oranges. Or fungii and trees.

Oh and a fungal tidbit:
Moreover, while humans and most species are divided into only two sexes, mushrooms contain over 36,000 sexes.

There's an orgy goin' on in them woods.


classicman  Tuesday Dec 25 12:51 PM

I've heard tell of some in South America, I think, that were even larger.



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