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   xoxoxoBruce  Friday Jul 4 12:23 AM

July 4, 2008: Friday Awwww

First MA, then CA, now this. Where will it end?




HungLikeJesus  Friday Jul 4 12:28 AM

Isn't that the thirteenth sign of the apocalypse?



DucksNuts  Friday Jul 4 12:35 AM

Im getting in with an "awwww" before the recipes start



richlevy  Friday Jul 4 01:10 AM

Quote:
Originally Posted by DucksNuts View Post
Im getting in with an "awwww" before the recipes start
Don't worry. It's going to take some time to find a recipe that works for venison and rabbit.

Rosemary and garlic?


morethanpretty  Friday Jul 4 01:23 AM

Don't eat Thumper and Bambie!



newtimer  Friday Jul 4 01:23 AM

I'm curious. What IS the proper word for meat that we get from a rabbit? Deer is to venison what rabbit is to ????



HungLikeJesus  Friday Jul 4 01:30 AM

Hasenpfeffer?



xoxoxoBruce  Friday Jul 4 01:46 AM

Waiter, there's a hare in my Hasenpfeffer.



stevecrm  Friday Jul 4 01:55 AM

Quote:
Originally Posted by xoxoxoBruce View Post
Waiter, there's a hare in my Hasenpfeffer.
thats not a hare Sir, its a rabbit, hares have longer legs


xoxoxoBruce  Friday Jul 4 02:07 AM

But that rabbit is fawning, deer.



zippyt  Friday Jul 4 02:11 AM

Deer God!!!

Road kill stew !!!



Scriveyn  Friday Jul 4 02:12 AM

"Friday Awwww"

What will be the offspring? Roebits?

And I want lingonberries with that (not to be confused with cranberries).



SPUCK  Friday Jul 4 03:25 AM

Ahhhh..

I'll trade you 2 ticks for 5 fleas.


Wild game => venison.



stevecrm  Friday Jul 4 03:41 AM

if you look closley you will relise that its not a rabbit but a midgit deer



Sundae  Friday Jul 4 05:46 AM

Rabbit meat is rabbit.
Like chicken meat is chicken and turkey meat is turkey.



DanaC  Friday Jul 4 06:44 AM

Quote:
I'm curious. What IS the proper word for meat that we get from a rabbit? Deer is to venison what rabbit is to ????
Rabbit is just rabbit.

The reason deer meat is 'venison', cow meat is 'beef' and pig meat is 'pork' is that those were meats eaten by the higher echelons of society in the early middle ages. The higher echelons of society in early medieval England were Norman (i.e French) and they imported their words for those meats into our language. The meats eaten by the lower orders (the native english) retained their original English names. i.e chicken and rabbit.

Turkey was introduced later and was not of the anglo-french period.


sweetwater  Friday Jul 4 08:38 AM

Awwww.... but in my mind I am photoshopping some jackalope antlers on the rabbit.



footfootfoot  Friday Jul 4 09:09 AM

That explains where Jackalope come from!



Sundae  Friday Jul 4 09:09 AM

Interestingly - we call turkey, turkey because it came from Turk traders.

The French call it Dinde - as in Poisson D'Inde - literally Indian Chicken - because it was supposed to come from India.

The Dutch call it kalkoen, which is Dutch for Calicut, an Indian port - again where it was supposedly from.

And the Spanich word for turkey is pavo - which was originally a peacock (peacock is now pavo real).

Just a bit of Friday afternoon linguistics for you.



spudcon  Friday Jul 4 09:45 AM

I don't care what they call `em, just stuff `em in a blender and cook `em.



xoxoxoBruce  Friday Jul 4 12:19 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by spudcon View Post
I don't care what they call `em, just stuff `em in a Bass-O-Matic and cook `em.
Fixed it fer ya.


spudcon  Friday Jul 4 04:29 PM

I stand corrected. Thank you Bruce.



newtimer  Friday Jul 4 11:10 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by Sundae Girl View Post
...as in Poisson D'Inde - literally Indian Chicken...
That's "Indian fish" in French.

And I always thought turkeys were native to North America. What were they doing in Turkey and India? Next are you going to tell us that apple pie is really from Mozambique?


morethanpretty  Saturday Jul 5 01:28 AM

Quote:
Originally Posted by newtimer View Post
And I always thought turkeys were native to North America. What were they doing in Turkey and India? Next are you going to tell us that apple pie is really from Mozambique?
They are, its probably the trade route they came through.


xoxoxoBruce  Saturday Jul 5 02:00 AM

Most of the early American pioneers had limited education, and couldn't spell Mozambique, so they changed it to apple.



bluecuracao  Saturday Jul 5 03:55 AM

Quote:
Originally Posted by richlevy View Post
Don't worry. It's going to take some time to find a recipe that works for venison and rabbit.

Rosemary and garlic?
Ah, no time at all. My friend's restaurant in Philadelphia, Bistro 7, regularly features rabbit and venison on the menu.


xoxoxoBruce  Saturday Jul 5 05:27 AM

I'll bet they're different recipes, though.



bluecuracao  Saturday Jul 5 06:24 AM

Well, you're right.



spudcon  Saturday Jul 5 08:06 AM

Put deer and rabbit parts in Bass-O-Matic, blend to lumpy mush, por into crock pot with one jar of grape jelly, cook overnight. feed it to the dog.



Sundae  Saturday Jul 5 10:09 AM

There was a TV competition last year for The Great British Menu - each dish that won was served at the British Ambassador's Dinner in France.

The main course was a variation on Stargazy Pie made with rabbit and crayfish. So perhaps rabbit & venison are not such strange bedfellows.



Imigo Jones  Saturday Jul 5 11:13 AM

Quote:
Originally Posted by Sundae Girl View Post
There was a TV competition last year for The Great British Menu - each dish that won was served at the British Ambassador's Dinner in France.

The main course was a variation on Stargazy Pie made with rabbit and crayfish.
Sundae Girl, you know I'm all for international goodwill.
So, what a great gesture by you Brits
to name this dish after the new French president.


Elspode  Saturday Jul 5 11:32 AM

Quote:
Originally Posted by stevecrm View Post
if you look closley you will relise that its not a rabbit but a midgit deer
Its a dolphin.


barefoot serpent  Monday Jul 7 11:26 AM

throw in a squirrel and you could make a sort of turducken

deerabbel.



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