Visit the Cellar!

The Cellar Image of the Day is just a section of a larger web community: bright folks talking about everything. The Cellar is the original coffeeshop with no coffee and no shop. Founded in 1990, The Cellar is one of the oldest communities on the net. Join us at the table if you like!

 
What's IotD?

The interesting, amazing, or mind-boggling images of our days.

IotD Stuff

ARCHIVES - over 13 years of IotD!
About IotD
RSS2
XML

Permalink Latest Image

May 25th, 2017: Snowmobile

Recent Images

May 24th, 2017: International Cryptozoology Museum
May 23rd, 2017: Sutro Baths
May 22nd, 2017: Ivy Oak
May 21st, 2017: Micro-Art
May 20th, 2017: Mr Rogers' Cardigans
May 19th, 2017: Ol Doinyo Lengai
May, 18th, 2017: Art Installation Milan

The CELLAR Tip Mug
Some folks who have noticed IotD

Neatorama
Worth1000
Mental Floss
Boing Boing
Switched
W3streams
GruntDoc's Blog
No Quarters
Making Light
darrenbarefoot.com
GromBlog
b3ta
Church of the Whale Penis
UniqueDaily.com
Sailor Coruscant
Projectionist

Link to us and we will try to find you after many months!

Common image haunts

Astro Pic of the Day
Earth Sci Pic of the Day
We Make Money Not Art
Spluch
ochevidec.net
Strange New Products
Geisha Asobi Blog
Cute animals blog (in Russian)
20minutos.es
Yahoo Most Emailed

Please avoid copyrighted images (or get permission) when posting!

Advertising

Philadelphia Pawn Shop
The best real estate agent in Montgomery County
The best T.38 Fax provider
Epps Beverages and Beer, Limerick, PA
Sal's Pizza, Elkins Park
Burholme Auto Body, Philadelphia
Coles Tobacco, Pottstown
ERM Auto Service, Glenside
Glenside Collision
Moorehead Catering, Trappe
Salon 153, Bala
Dominicks Auto Body, Phoenixville

   xoxoxoBruce  Wednesday Jul 9 12:50 AM

July 9, 2008: Constellation Program

You've probably heard NASA is winding down the shuttle program, and leaving it to the Russians to support the International Space Station.
You've probably also heard, their new mandate is to go back to the moon by 2020. This has been named the Constellation Program.

At the Johnson Space Center's Lunar Yard, they are already testing several equipment designs, so they must have started on the design phase, years ago.
I would guess it was back when gas was under $2 a gallon, because they planning on taking SUVs to the Moon.







stevecrm  Wednesday Jul 9 02:28 AM

If there is no gravity on the moon, how would these vehicles stay on the ground?



morethanpretty  Wednesday Jul 9 02:32 AM

There is gravity on any mass, just the greater the mass, greater the gravity. right?



rupip  Wednesday Jul 9 02:39 AM

there is gravity on the moon - but just 1/6th of the gravity we have to deal with on earth.



SPUCK  Wednesday Jul 9 05:46 AM

Same amount of inertia though..

That first car is sooOOOooOO lame.. I don't get it.



glatt  Wednesday Jul 9 09:08 AM

It would be a lot more reliable and cheaper if they just rode mountain bikes.



tombstone  Wednesday Jul 9 10:42 AM

For that last picture, in my mind's eye, I can just see the astronaut leaping up to the door....



SteveDallas  Wednesday Jul 9 11:04 AM

Quote:
Originally Posted by SPUCK View Post
That first car is sooOOOooOO lame.. I don't get it.
Why don't they just send a Segway and be done with it?


Diaphone Jim  Wednesday Jul 9 12:11 PM

I like the bottom ones. They look like mobile outhouses: they come to you when you gotta go.
Actually, all the designs in the world can't hide the fact that manned space exploration is just not a good idea.
The Apollo moon flights were exciting, but the current crop of magnificent Landers, Rovers, and Orbiters (at least 5 planets!!) are the way to learn about things other-worldly.



Clodfobble  Wednesday Jul 9 03:34 PM

There is zero ground clearance on the second one, how can it possibly go over any sort of planet surface?



Griff  Wednesday Jul 9 03:45 PM

Clod it looks like there's a pivot for a hydralic lift on the second one. The Segway is an apt comparison though. All these look like a triumph of advertising over common sense.



glatt  Wednesday Jul 9 03:53 PM

Surely they wouldn't fill those tires with air for the final design that goes to the moon? Pop! Pop! Pop! Pop! Pop! Pop!



el fantastico  Wednesday Jul 9 03:56 PM

since nasa already chopped and dropped their whips, they need to add thumpin systems to go with the hydraulics. "then i let the alpine play..."



Griff  Wednesday Jul 9 03:57 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by el fantastico View Post
since nasa already chopped and dropped their whips, they need to add thumpin systems to go with the hydraulics. "then i let the alpine play..."
Nice!


spudcon  Wednesday Jul 9 04:13 PM

Great. Now they're gonna start NASCAR on the moon!



footfootfoot  Wednesday Jul 9 04:19 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by Clodfobble View Post
There is zero ground clearance on the second one, how can it possibly go over any sort of planet surface?
sound stages are pretty flat.


Griff  Wednesday Jul 9 04:26 PM

Can they do it in the age of high def?



monster  Wednesday Jul 9 07:17 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by xoxoxoBruce View Post
I would guess it was back when gas was under $2 a gallon, because they planning on taking SUVs to the Moon.
it's OK, there's no gas prices on the moon


Imigo Jones  Wednesday Jul 9 11:26 PM

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Craters_of_the_Moon_National_Monument

Quote:
Originally Posted by xoxoxoBruce View Post
At the Johnson Space Center's Lunar Yard, they are already testing several equipment designs, so they must have started on the design phase, years ago.
Thanks for the link, Bruce. I've been exploring the NASA site quite a bit--cool stuff.
I never saw that first rover, which may be at JSC, but just so astrotourists aren't 2/3 disappointed on their visit to Houston:
The lunar rovers in pics 2 and 3 were tested in the state of Washington:

NASA Tests Lunar Robots and Spacesuits on Earthen Moonscape ["Earthen"?]

Conditions on the moon will be harsher, but prototype NASA robotic vehicles and their developers braved sand storms and unprecedented temperature swings on sweeping dunes near Moses Lake, Wash. [halfway between Mount Rainier and Idaho], this month to prepare for the future.



Student astronaut, distracted by text messaging,
"splashed down" into the Sea of Tranquillity.


Teams from seven NASA centers and one university coordinated their activities on the Moses Lake Sand Dunes from June 2-13 to gain hands-on experience with specific technical challenges anticipated when humans return to the moon by 2020 and begin to explore the lunar surface and set up initial outposts.


While you're on that page, click "Photo Gallery" (under article) or "Gallery: Evaluating Lunar Concepts" (at right; same gallery).
Lookit what this other gallery page for the vehicle in pic 2 is called!
Live and animated videos.


Imigo Jones  Wednesday Jul 9 11:29 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by xoxoxoBruce View Post
At the Johnson Space Center's Lunar Yard, they are already testing several equipment designs, so they must have started on the design phase, years ago.
Thanks for the link, Bruce. I've been exploring the NASA site quite a bit--cool stuff.
I never saw that first rover, which may be at JSC, but just so astrotourists aren't 2/3 disappointed on their visit to Houston:
The lunar rovers in pics 2 and 3 were tested in the state of Washington:

NASA Tests Lunar Robots and Spacesuits on Earthen Moonscape ["Earthen"?]

Conditions on the moon will be harsher, but prototype NASA robotic vehicles and their developers braved sand storms and unprecedented temperature swings on sweeping dunes near Moses Lake, Wash. [halfway between Mount Rainier and Idaho], this month to prepare for the future.



Student astronaut, distracted by text messaging,
"splashed down" into the Sea of Tranquillity.


Teams from seven NASA centers and one university coordinated their activities on the Moses Lake Sand Dunes from June 2-13 to gain hands-on experience with specific technical challenges anticipated when humans return to the moon by 2020 and begin to explore the lunar surface and set up initial outposts.


While you're on that page, click "Photo Gallery" (under article) or "Gallery: Evaluating Lunar Concepts" (at right; same gallery).
Lookit what this other gallery page for the vehicle in pic 2 is called!
Live and animated videos.


Sundae  Thursday Jul 10 08:32 AM

FAIL!



Shawnee123  Thursday Jul 10 09:03 AM

Quote:
Originally Posted by spudcon View Post
Great. Now they're gonna start NASCAR on the moon!
Nooooooooooooooooooooooooooo. Please, no.


Imigo Jones  Thursday Jul 10 10:22 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by xoxoxoBruce View Post
You've probably also heard, their new mandate is to go back to the moon by 2020. This has been named the Constellation Program.
I continue to be disturbed by certain issues of nomenclature:

". . . the Constellation Program to send human explorers back to the moon, and then onward to Mars and other destinations in the solar system." Why is this program named after a grouping of stars, when the program is staying within the solar system?

The launch vehicles (rockets) are named Ares, the Greek name for Mars, which is a planet, fine.

The crew vehicle (space capsule, not the SUV) is named Orion, which is a constellation but still has nothing to do with the Moon or the rest of our solar system.



Not 1950s sci-fi art but NASA artist's rendering of the lunar lander.

The lunar lander is named Altair, which is the name of the biggest star in the constellation Aquila, the eagle. Hey, there's at least a connection with Neil Armstrong's lunar lander, the Eagle. . . . [Later] Oh, I see the lander page explains that.

In surfing that quadrant of the NASA site, I saw various lunar rovers called NASA Concept Vehicle (pic 1 in Bruce’s OP), Crew Mobility Chassis Prototype (pic 2), and Crew Exploration Vehicle—blah.

To summarize: Here's a mission to the Moon, first, then elsewhere in the solar system. The names currently refer to a type of star grouping, a planet, a particular constellation, a star in a different constellation, and just some working titles. Where's any consistency?

NASA should rename everything to focus on the lunar mission. When the time comes, they can name further stuff after Mars and Jupiter, but it doesn't make any sense at any time to go outside the solar system for names for spaceships and such, when there are plenty of great names closer to Earth:

Program: the Soleil Moon Frye Program (= solar system in general + Moon in particular + common east Asian pronunciation of "fly")

Launch vehicle: the Keith Moon

Crew vehicle: the Ban Ki-moon

Lunar lander: the Moon Landrieu

Crew Exploration Vehicle: the Moon Unit Zappa

Constellation Program Office (Johnson Space Center, Houston): Marion Moon Aldrin Domestic Engineering Center


Your reply here?

The Cellar Image of the Day is just a section of a larger web community: a bunch of interesting folks talking about everything. Add your two cents to IotD by joining the Cellar.