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   Undertoad  Saturday Oct 12 02:20 PM

10/12/2002: Forgotten disease



Via the medical blog Medpundit comes this oddity. This former adolescent had a disease called "yaws", described in this case as "bilateral goundou".

Yaws is almost wiped out as a disease. It is caused by a micro-organism related to syphillis, in this case growing out the bone itself. Imagine what this person would have looked like.

The development of antibiotics blew out the disease in the developed world and today it only exists in tiny levels in Africa.



Nic Name  Saturday Oct 12 02:31 PM

Quote:
goundou n.

a condition following an infection with yaws in which the nasal processes of the upper jaw bone thicken (see hyperostosis) to form two large bony swellings, about 7 cm in diameter, on either side of the nose.

The swellings not only obstruct the nostrils but also interfere with the field of vision. Initial symptoms include persistent headache and a bloody purulent discharge from the nose.

Early cases can be treated with injections of penicillin; otherwise surgical removal of the growths is necessary. Goundou occurs in central Africa and South America.
I can see how that might interfere with the field of vision!


Nic Name  Saturday Oct 12 02:37 PM

I didn't know ...

Quote:
During the 1950s, yaws was the world's most common tropical illness. Since that time, the World Health Organization (WHO) has battled yaws in many tropical areas of the world. More than 160 million people have been examined in 46 countries, and more than 50 million cases of yaws have been treated with penicillin. As a result, the incidence of yaws declined dramatically worldwide.



blowmeetheclown  Saturday Oct 12 05:57 PM

It's amazing that in some cases, we don't give a damn about an organism's extinction.



tokenidiot  Saturday Oct 12 10:55 PM

I cry for you, Yaws microorganisms.



juju  Sunday Oct 13 12:50 AM

It's not really worthy of life if it's not cute.



jeni  Sunday Oct 13 02:05 AM

so true, juju. so true.

case in point: spiders. i'm sure the boy will agree with me on this one.



tokenidiot  Sunday Oct 13 01:27 PM

yes, definitely. especially when they hide in the bathroom.



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