Visit the Cellar!

The Cellar Image of the Day is just a section of a larger web community: bright folks talking about everything. The Cellar is the original coffeeshop with no coffee and no shop. Founded in 1990, The Cellar is one of the oldest communities on the net. Join us at the table if you like!

 
What's IotD?

The interesting, amazing, or mind-boggling images of our days.

IotD Stuff

ARCHIVES - over 13 years of IotD!
About IotD
RSS2
XML

Permalink Latest Image

Oct 20th, 2017: Fake News

Recent Images

Oct 19th, 2017: Copycat
Oct 18th, 2017: Lollypops
Oct 17th, 2017: Queen Tarzi
Oct 16th, 2017: Cook Pines
Oct 15th, 2017: Station Dog (Jim Dog)
Oct 14th, 2017: Doughnut Girls & Donut Dollies
Oct 13th(Friday), 2017: Internment Camps

The CELLAR Tip Mug
Some folks who have noticed IotD

Neatorama
Worth1000
Mental Floss
Boing Boing
Switched
W3streams
GruntDoc's Blog
No Quarters
Making Light
darrenbarefoot.com
GromBlog
b3ta
Church of the Whale Penis
UniqueDaily.com
Sailor Coruscant
Projectionist

Link to us and we will try to find you after many months!

Common image haunts

Astro Pic of the Day
Earth Sci Pic of the Day
We Make Money Not Art
Spluch
ochevidec.net
Strange New Products
Geisha Asobi Blog
Cute animals blog (in Russian)
20minutos.es
Yahoo Most Emailed

Please avoid copyrighted images (or get permission) when posting!

Advertising

Philadelphia Pawn Shop
The best real estate agent in Montgomery County
The best T.38 Fax provider
Epps Beverages and Beer, Limerick, PA
Sal's Pizza, Elkins Park
Burholme Auto Body, Philadelphia
Coles Tobacco, Pottstown
ERM Auto Service, Glenside
Glenside Collision
Moorehead Catering, Trappe
Salon 153, Bala
Dominicks Auto Body, Phoenixville

   Undertoad  Sunday Mar 13 07:25 PM

Mar 13, 2011: Japan: earthquake, tsunami and aftermath



Boston.com's Big Picture has an amazing collection of photos out of which it's impossible to pick one, so here's the first. Amazing and sad, all of it. As I watched the video of water coming in and taking everything with it, sometimes a fire would break out as a house or other building would be taken. And that's the most amazing thing, amongst all this water, that fire would still be a major concern somehow.



Razzmatazz13  Monday Mar 14 02:37 AM

Thanks Cellar... without cable I was having a hard time finding reliable information about this. It's so massive that it's hard to wrap your head around. The photos help a lot more than statistics for me to get a grasp on it.



SPUCK  Monday Mar 14 06:17 AM

What keeps going thru my head is:

Where are they gonna dump all this crap? It' not like a few truck loads to the dump! Japan doesn't even have the space for a landfill this big.

Discussion:
If thru some miracle this whole place was cleaned up into a gorgeous garden like spot - what would be your opinion/thinking on rebuilding a home three hundred feet from the beach?



ZenGum  Monday Mar 14 06:22 AM

Maybe they will use the waste as landfill to reclaim/build up a few more square kilometres of land area from the sea. And then build on it. Until the next big earthquake and tsunami.

ETA: Japan is very used to destruction and rebuilding. Some temples are rebuilt every 20 years to keep the techniques alive. They are still regarded to be several hundred years old.



SPUCK  Monday Mar 14 06:26 AM

Check this nice before-after on MSNBC. It's very well done.

http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/42064847...ws-asiapacific



Gravdigr  Monday Mar 14 07:09 PM

Have you noticed we haven't heard the "L" word? No looting, yet. Wonder why? Decent, civilized people perhaps?



bluecuracao  Monday Mar 14 10:54 PM

Or there's nothing left to loot...the stores that weren't destroyed are out of everything.



lupin..the..3rd  Tuesday Mar 15 01:04 AM

Quote:
Originally Posted by ZenGum View Post
ETA: Japan is very used to destruction and rebuilding. Some temples are rebuilt every 20 years to keep the techniques alive. They are still regarded to be several hundred years old.
Don't forget Godzilla. And Mothra too. This quake is nothing compared to the destruction those two have caused.


onetrack  Thursday Mar 17 08:27 AM

There is almost no looting, because the Japanese are very civilised, and stealing is regarded as a very low act. In addition, police have local stations in every suburb, and know 98% of the people in their operating region .. so they know when outsiders or strangers appear, and they watch anyone carefully, with a known criminal history. Thus, criminality is very low in relation to many other "civilised" nations.

Excellent tsunami picture site here .. these pics were taken on the day of the tsunami, and one or two days afterwards .. http://totallycoolpix.com/2011/03/th...ami-aftermath/

I have no idea how the Japs will clean up the mess. One thing is for sure, it will take a long time. However, there will be a very large % of the wreckage recycled, as the Japs don't create much waste, they can't afford to, as they have nowhere available for landfills.
As you can see in the "before" pics on the MSNBC website, every square metre of available land is used .. for building on, or for farming.



Clodfobble  Thursday Mar 17 09:20 AM

Quote:
Originally Posted by onetrack
There is almost no looting, because the Japanese are very civilised, and stealing is regarded as a very low act. In addition, police have local stations in every suburb, and know 98% of the people in their operating region .. so they know when outsiders or strangers appear, and they watch anyone carefully, with a known criminal history.
On the other hand, this can blind them rather foolishly. Most of my female (white) friends have been left alone, but the white male I know who's been teaching English over there for years has been approached personally by the cops in every new place he's moved into, and every time there's a crime in his area. One cop explained that it was policy to check on the whereabouts of all foreigners when a crime was committed, because "Japanese people don't commit crime."


onetrack  Thursday Mar 17 10:40 AM

Yes, that must be annoying, but that's the way the Japanese police work. You can't deny the fact that their overall crime rate is low. The Jap cop was probably being a little too bolshy with his statement .. but basically, he's right.
If a crime is committed in Japan, there's a high likelihood it's a newcomer to the area. In addition, males are grossly over-represented in all crime, so males are the ones that immediate suspicion falls upon.

One thing I did notice, and I don't think I'm wrong. Did anyone else notice that the largest % of Japanese shown in the disaster areas, were relatively elderly people?
This would jell with the fact that the Japanese population is aging .. and that older folk commit far less crime than younger people .. thus the relative lack of looting.



Lamplighter  Friday Mar 9 02:39 PM

This is a link to a 2-page article out today on behind-the-scenes
government activities during and after the tsunami.

As I recall the events, the US and international experts were saying that
things at the nuclear power plants were much worse than what
was being reported by the governmental authorities.
This article pretty much confirms that
... and what most of us have come to see from later news reports.

ABC News
By MARI YAMAGUCHI Associated Press
3/9/12

Records Show Japan Gov't Knew Meltdown Risk Early

Quote:
Just four hours after the tsunami swept into the Fukushima nuclear power plant,
Japan's leaders knew the damage was so severe the reactors could melt down,
but they kept their knowledge secret for months.
Five days into the crisis, then-Prime Minister Naoto Kan
voiced his fears it could turn worse than Chernobyl.<snip>

Apparently the government tried to play down the severity of the damage.
A spokesman for the Nuclear and Industrial Safety Agency was replaced
after he slipped out a possibility of meltdown during a news conference March 12.<snip>

While then-trade minister Banri Kaieda suggested on March 11 that
residents within a 10-kilometer (6-mile) radius might have to be evacuated,
the government ordered 1,800-plus residents within a 2-kilometer (1.2-mile) zone to leave.
Then that expanded to 3 kilometers, then to 10 kilometers within two hours,
and finally to 20 kilometers the next day.<snip>

The plant operator, Tokyo Electric Power Co., acknowledged a partial meltdown much later, in May.
<snip>



HungLikeJesus  Friday Mar 9 02:51 PM

tw knew.



Lamplighter  Friday Mar 9 02:58 PM

and said so



footfootfoot  Friday Mar 9 03:35 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by Clodfobble View Post
One cop explained that it was policy to check on the whereabouts of all foreigners when a crime was committed, because "Japanese people don't commit crime in their own country, if anyone is watching."



classicman  Friday Mar 9 09:51 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by HungLikeJesus View Post
tw assumed.
ftfy


Your reply here?

The Cellar Image of the Day is just a section of a larger web community: a bunch of interesting folks talking about everything. Add your two cents to IotD by joining the Cellar.