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   CaliforniaMama  Sunday Aug 14 09:44 AM

August 14, 2011 Milking Horse Shoe Crabs

Here is a beautiful example of man utilizing nature in a way that does not destroy. I only wish this were the norm.

Attachment 33465

Quote:
It’s blue, comes from a creature more ancient than dinosaurs, and saves countless human lives.

. . . for decades it’s proved vital to biomedical companies that must screen vaccines, IV fluids, and medical devices for bacteria that can be fatal in our bloodstream. Thanks to proteins in cells that act like a primitive immune system, the crabs’ blood coagulates instantly when it touches pathogens like E. coli and Salmonella.
Quote:
About 500,000 horseshoe crabs are collected annually along the U.S. East Coast under interstate regulations.

In a laboratory, blood is drawn from the crab’s primitive equivalent of a heart.

The live crabs are returned to the sea. The estimated mortality rate is 15 percent.

The blood’s blue color comes from copper in its oxygen-carrying protein, hemocyanin— akin to the iron-based hemoglobin in humans.
Quote:
About 20 percent of each crab’s blood is collected before it’s returned to the water.
PHOTOS: MARK THIESSEN, NGM Staff

via National Geographic


CaliforniaMama  Sunday Aug 14 09:49 AM

I have to admit this image totally grosses me out. It is all I could do to create the post with my gut in a clench to avoid tossing . . .

I guess it is just seeing these creatures clamped down with a tube draining blue liquid. It is a bit too alien for me. It's just kinda creepy.

Or it is what humans tend to fear aliens will do to us.

Whatever it is, the image is just too much for me, even though the whole practice seems so noble and harm-free.

And just how in the world did someone discover this in the first place? Do scientists just randomly go around playing with the blood of creatures to see what it will do?



TheMercenary  Sunday Aug 14 10:04 AM

We have a small island near my home that is covered with Horse shoe crabs.



Diaphone Jim  Sunday Aug 14 12:22 PM

Looks like Blue Smoothie time at the Darth Vader factory.



Happy Monkey  Monday Aug 15 03:25 PM

Tough little things. Folded in half until its dorsal joint cracks open, drained of a fifth of their blood through that wound, and only a 15% mortality rate.



Diaphone Jim  Monday Aug 15 07:50 PM

15% mortality is only an approximation, but it's close enough in horse shoes.



Wombat  Monday Aug 15 10:53 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by CaliforniaMama View Post
in a way that does not destroy
erm, 15% of them die.


Wombat  Monday Aug 15 10:54 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by CaliforniaMama View Post
even though the whole practice seems so noble and harm-free
again: 15% of them DIE.


Clodfobble  Monday Aug 15 11:07 PM

What percentage of humans die without the microbial screening? It's not like they're torturing them for their all-natural aphrodisiac and penis-enlargement properties.



Flint  Monday Aug 15 11:32 PM

This is 20% ... ???
Nearly a whole bottle that is half the size of the poor bastard's entire body?
You ever had blood drawn and they bring out a 55 gallon drum?



Nirvana  Monday Aug 15 11:48 PM

Where is the butter?



CaliforniaMama  Tuesday Aug 16 08:45 AM

Quote:
Originally Posted by Wombat View Post
erm, 15% of them die.
To rephrase: . . . in a way that does not wipe out the horse shoe crab population.

Unlike the practice of harvesting shark fins where the fins are cut off and the shark thrown back into the water to die. 85% of the horse shoe crabs get returned to the ocean to live another day.

Plus, I think it is great that they are using crabs from the ocean and not creating an industry of raising them in captivity.


infinite monkey  Tuesday Aug 16 08:49 AM

Quote:
Originally Posted by CaliforniaMama View Post
To rephrase: . . . in a way that does not wipe out the horse shoe crab population.

Unlike the practice of harvesting shark fins where the fins are cut off and the shark thrown back into the water to die. 85% of the horse shoe crabs get returned to the ocean to live another day.
Plus, I think it is great that they are using crabs from the ocean and not creating an industry of raising them in captivity.
85% of the problems of horseshoe milking are caused by top horseshoe management.


Happy Monkey  Tuesday Aug 16 11:54 AM

Quote:
Originally Posted by CaliforniaMama View Post
Unlike the practice of harvesting shark fins where the fins are cut off and the shark thrown back into the water to die. 85% of the horse shoe crabs get returned to the ocean to live another day.
Well over 85% of the shark is returned to the ocean... oh, wait- "to live another day". Never mind.


Flint  Tuesday Aug 16 12:11 PM

:::chortle:::



ZenGum  Tuesday Aug 16 08:13 PM

Chuckles indeed.



richlevy  Tuesday Aug 16 09:55 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by Nirvana View Post
Where is the butter?
Sorry, but no

Quote:
Some people eat horseshoe crab eggs and roe, since there aren't any other edible parts on it.
These creatures aren't even really crabs, let alone any type of crustacean. Although they may look similar to a crab, they actually belong to the family of Limulidae.
This said, they are much closer to scorpions, spiders, and ticks than they are to any crustacean.



Clodfobble  Tuesday Aug 16 11:10 PM

What, you didn't know that's what they make Egg McMuffins out of?



Undertoad  Tuesday Aug 16 11:17 PM

Quote:
The eggs of horseshoe crabs aren't attended by the parents. Instead, they are simply deposited in the sand by the female as she drags the male along behind her to fertilize the eggs. The male hangs onto the back of the females shell with his claws and is usually about two-thirds the size of the female. Being this much smaller, he provides little resistance as he is dragged around the sand by the egg-depositing female.
WOO WOO SEXY TIMES


Sundae  Wednesday Aug 17 07:18 AM

Ewwww - spider sex.
That's what I think when I see a large woman with a much smaller man.

I wonder if she might eat him afterwards.



CaliforniaMama  Wednesday Aug 17 08:48 AM

Quote:
Originally Posted by Sundae View Post
I wonder if she might eat him afterwards.
Kind of like the praying mantis.


Spexxvet  Wednesday Aug 17 07:06 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by richlevy View Post
Sorry, but no
Quote:
Some people eat horseshoe crab eggs and roe, since there aren't any other edible parts on it.
These creatures aren't even really crabs, let alone any type of crustacean. Although they may look similar to a crab, they actually belong to the family of Limulidae.
This said, they are much closer to scorpions, spiders, and ticks than they are to any crustacean.
They are harvested for bait, though. Some kind of sea life must love them.


Spexxvet  Wednesday Aug 17 07:06 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by CaliforniaMama View Post
Kind of like the praying mantis.
And Sally Struthers.


classicman  Wednesday Aug 17 08:59 PM

Conch love to eat them.



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