Visit the Cellar!

The Cellar Image of the Day is just a section of a larger web community: bright folks talking about everything. The Cellar is the original coffeeshop with no coffee and no shop. Founded in 1990, The Cellar is one of the oldest communities on the net. Join us at the table if you like!

 
What's IotD?

The interesting, amazing, or mind-boggling images of our days.

IotD Stuff

ARCHIVES - over 13 years of IotD!
About IotD
RSS2
XML

Permalink Latest Image

Aug 18th, 2017: Kimís Bicycle

Recent Images

Aug 17th, 2017: Susquehanna Ice Bridge
Aug 15th, 2017: Trailer Park
Aug 14th, 2017: Pollen
Aug 13th, 2017: Rosemary Smith Can Drive Better Than You
Aug 12th, 2017: Boeing Selfie
Aug 11th, 2017: Power to the People
Aug 10th, 2017: Bloom County

The CELLAR Tip Mug
Some folks who have noticed IotD

Neatorama
Worth1000
Mental Floss
Boing Boing
Switched
W3streams
GruntDoc's Blog
No Quarters
Making Light
darrenbarefoot.com
GromBlog
b3ta
Church of the Whale Penis
UniqueDaily.com
Sailor Coruscant
Projectionist

Link to us and we will try to find you after many months!

Common image haunts

Astro Pic of the Day
Earth Sci Pic of the Day
We Make Money Not Art
Spluch
ochevidec.net
Strange New Products
Geisha Asobi Blog
Cute animals blog (in Russian)
20minutos.es
Yahoo Most Emailed

Please avoid copyrighted images (or get permission) when posting!

Advertising

Philadelphia Pawn Shop
The best real estate agent in Montgomery County
The best T.38 Fax provider
Epps Beverages and Beer, Limerick, PA
Sal's Pizza, Elkins Park
Burholme Auto Body, Philadelphia
Coles Tobacco, Pottstown
ERM Auto Service, Glenside
Glenside Collision
Moorehead Catering, Trappe
Salon 153, Bala
Dominicks Auto Body, Phoenixville

   Nirvana  Tuesday Nov 1 10:32 PM

Nov 2nd, 2011 Deer Snack

The 16-foot snake captured and killed in the Everglades had consumed a 76-pound deer.





LINK



classicman  Tuesday Nov 1 10:47 PM

I won't even wait till tomorrow ... WOW! Thats scary.



ZenGum  Tuesday Nov 1 11:21 PM

Attachment 35065

What is this crazy "tomorrow" talk?


Spit Roast Burmese Python
1. Capture and gut your Burmese Python.
2. Obtain a roasting spit of suffiient length.
2.a Try wiring together several regular spits.
2.b Maybe try a shipyard for an old mast or something.
2.c Oh I don't know, you figure it out.
3. Carefully impale the python on the roasting spit, making sure it is well supprted along the whole length.
3.a Have another try.
3.b Take the deer out of its stomach. Try again.
3.c No, you'll need a thinner, sharper spit.
3.d Hmmmm.
4. Stir fry diced burmese python!
5. Dice your python into bite sized chunks.
5.a you may want to get someone to help you with this.
5.b. In fact, call a working bee....



classicman  Tuesday Nov 1 11:45 PM

LLOLASTC

Literally laughed out loud and scared the cats



Aliantha  Tuesday Nov 1 11:57 PM

And you people complain about the snakes we have over here!



Lamplighter  Wednesday Nov 2 01:24 AM

But originally those weren't over here...
a few kinds of poisonous reptiles, but none that could eat you.



Aliantha  Wednesday Nov 2 01:36 AM

Yeah, but you still have bears and mountain lions!



Lamplighter  Wednesday Nov 2 01:50 AM

True, but it's really the yellow jackets that worry me.
It's autumn here now and they are really mean.
.



glatt  Wednesday Nov 2 08:18 AM

Are burmese pythons really a problem as an invasive species, or did Bungalo Bill just want a trophy animal?

This is a National Park, not somebody's back yard. So one wild animal ate another. Isn't it showing favoritism to kill the predator? Around here, deer overpopulation is a problem. Leave the predators alone.



Lamplighter  Wednesday Nov 2 09:30 AM

The pythons are an invasive species, and causing serious troubles.

They sdfd the "pets" of people who turned them loose when they got too big for the owners.
Apparently they are well adapted to the Everglades and are multiplying.

Most Fish and Wildlife policies are to (try to) eliminate the invasive species... it's not to show favoritism to predator or prey



Gravdigr  Wednesday Nov 2 02:10 PM

Venithon?

Pythison?



glatt  Wednesday Nov 2 03:51 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by Lamplighter View Post
The pythons are an invasive species, and causing serious troubles.
Invasive, sure. I'll buy that. But what serious troubles are they causing?


infinite monkey  Wednesday Nov 2 03:56 PM

It's gettin' so you can't even walk down the street in the Everglades without running into a rogue python!



classicman  Wednesday Nov 2 03:59 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by ZenGum View Post
Attachment 35065

What is this crazy "tomorrow" talk?
How the heck did you do that? You posted a response to my post BEFORE I posted it...


infinite monkey  Wednesday Nov 2 04:05 PM

Wait a minute. How DID he do that?

I guess that's why he's the doctor!



Lamplighter  Wednesday Nov 2 04:28 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by glatt View Post
Invasive, sure. I'll buy that. But what serious troubles are they causing?
I can't speak with authority, but I had heard before there were issues
with the snakes and alligators (threatened or endangered species ?),
and the very large number of these snakes there now.


wolf  Wednesday Nov 2 05:10 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by Lamplighter View Post
They sdfd the "pets" of people who turned them loose when they got too big for the owners.
Apparently they are well adapted to the Everglades and are multiplying.
It's only fair ... The New York Sewer System has taken in all those (formerly cute baby) alligators, and sends down Burmese Pythons in return.


Aliantha  Wednesday Nov 2 07:57 PM

Any new species introduced to an environment is going to have an effect on the existing environment and the perception by humans is usually going to be that it's a negative impact because it's going to change what we see as how that particular environment should be.

So, then it comes down to what the actual impacts are. Is the new species reducing or obliterating the original inhabitants of the environment and are those inhabitants themselves native to the area?

I'm no expert, but I'd say that if a python that size is living there and multiplying, it's going to change the environment. The question is whether it's going to be change for the good or bad.

I'd imagine they'd eat quite a lot of birds eggs, and correct me if I'm wrong, but aren't the everglades considered famous in part because they're a nesting ground for so many species of birds?



glatt  Wednesday Nov 2 08:18 PM

I'm no expert on the Everglades, but I seem to remember that big cats of some type or other used to live there a century or two ago. They don't anymore. So there is already a predator vacuum. Why not replace one predator with another? Maybe they can even take care of those nutria rat things that are breeding all over the place.

It just seems like the standard "eek it's a snake" reaction could be subdued a little if it's not a suburban enclave. This is the wild.



Lamplighter  Wednesday Nov 2 09:35 PM

We are such a polarized country now, it seems the only way for things
to happen is to be based in existing law... no new environmental laws get passed.

In the Pacific Northwest, the Endangered Species Act is the foremost environmental law.
On top of that there are the tribal / treaty laws involving Native Americans.
Most everyone has heard of the tribulations of the salmon and the spotted owl.

But pity the state and federal agencies that have to deal with this tangled mess.
About the only thing that these folk are in agreement on now,
is the "hold your ground"... don't lose what we have now.
AND the removal and/or eradication of invasive species.

For OR and WA, this includes plants as well as animals and birds,
water-born plants and snails and frogs and feral hogs and feral cats,
and gray squirrels and English ivy and Scotch broom and ...

Everything else is political... commercial fishing, sport fishing, hunting,
off-road sports, winter sports, tourism, and on and on.
The winners are usually the ones with the most $ to spend.

I, personally, haven't heard a lot about all this in the midwest or east.
I assume every state or region has it's own issues,
and for Florida it seems to be the pythons.



ZenGum  Thursday Nov 3 02:37 AM

How the hell does a python catch a deer, anyway?

Deer are fast, flighty critturs that bolt at the first sign of danger. I know that the python - once it has something in its grip - can squish the life out of pretty much anything. But how does it manage that first step of wrapping around the deer?

If I knew this I would probably have nightmares about it.



ZenGum  Thursday Nov 3 02:39 AM

Quote:
Originally Posted by classicman View Post
How the heck did you do that? You posted a response to my post BEFORE I posted it...
Quote:
Originally Posted by infinite monkey View Post
Wait a minute. How DID he do that?

I guess that's why he's the doctor!
Time zone Lord!


SPUCK  Thursday Nov 3 05:28 AM

Quote:
Originally Posted by ZenGum View Post
How the hell does a python catch a deer, anyway?

Deer are fast, flighty critturs that bolt at the first sign of danger. I know that the python - once it has something in its grip - can squish the life out of pretty much anything. But how does it manage that first step of wrapping around the deer?

If I knew this I would probably have nightmares about it.
Deer are about as smart as a door knob. They lay down during the day and just sit there. A python can smell them from a long ways away and vector in on them ever s o s l o o o o o w l y.

Look at rats and mice! They're totally amped out nervous ninnies but are the staple food for most smaller snakes.


Griff  Thursday Nov 3 06:41 AM

I think the initial report said the deer died of something else and then the snake ate it.



ZenGum  Thursday Nov 3 07:26 AM

Quote:
Originally Posted by SPUCK View Post
Deer are about as smart as a door knob. They lay down during the day and just sit there. A python can smell them from a long ways away and vector in on them ever s o s l o o o o o w l y.

Look at rats and mice! They're totally amped out nervous ninnies but are the staple food for most smaller snakes.
Yeah, but somehow the snake has to go from sneaking up to "gotchya". It's the moment where the snake gets enough loops around the deer to hold it that I'm having trouble imagining.

Well, it obviously happens. There's that African Rock Python picture, IIRC that thing had a Thompson's gazelle in it.

Smaller snakes have poison. That I understand. Sneak up, strike, wait a few moments.


Aliantha  Thursday Nov 3 07:51 AM

I don't think the deer would get very far with a snake mouth around it's head. It'd have no eye deer where it was going for starters. I crack me up! lol



Clodfobble  Thursday Nov 3 03:44 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by ZenGum
Yeah, but somehow the snake has to go from sneaking up to "gotchya". It's the moment where the snake gets enough loops around the deer to hold it that I'm having trouble imagining.

Well, it obviously happens. There's that African Rock Python picture, IIRC that thing had a Thompson's gazelle in it.

Smaller snakes have poison. That I understand. Sneak up, strike, wait a few moments.
We've had several smaller pythons as pets in years past. (The smaller pythons still have no venom.) They can move very fast. Skip the first 15 seconds:



The really big ones will often hide in trees and strike downward when the prey walks underneath.


BigV  Thursday Nov 3 03:49 PM

Quote:
(The smaller pythons still have no venom.)
NO pythons have venom; their size is irrelevant.


wolf  Thursday Nov 3 04:06 PM

Anybody else surprised by noticing that the mouse neither pees nor shits itself? I know I would under similar circumstances ...



Cyber Wolf  Thursday Nov 3 08:12 PM

Attenborough explains. Basically a python can and will sit in one spot forever until something wanders close. And I'd imagine, after being there for so long and not smelling like anything dangerous, lunch might wander right up to it. And all snakes have lightning strikes, even the big ones. The big ones just hit harder when they connect. One good hit will get the teeth in and at that point it's game over.




SPUCK  Friday Nov 4 06:06 AM

Mice and rats often have the crap squeezed out of them during the process. About 40% of the time.

Constrictors can very quietly gather themselves into striking loops. Their reach is about 1/3 their body length and there is nothing much that can dodge a correctly aimed strike.

The eminent herpetologist Raymond Ditmars used to demonstrate this fact by feeding mongooses to his pythons. Apparently the snakes never got the, "mongooses are really fast", memo because they always chowed down on them.

The 350 re-curved teeth help a lot too. The one that bit me had a hard time un-biting me. He left 4 teeth stuck in me too.



CaliforniaMama  Friday Nov 4 09:57 AM

Quote:
Originally Posted by SPUCK View Post
The 350 re-curved teeth help a lot too. The one that bit me had a hard time un-biting me. He left 4 teeth stuck in me too.
YIKES!!!!


ZenGum  Friday Nov 4 07:46 PM

Ditto!

And thanks for the explanations. That final bunched-up launch/bite/wrap was the bit I was not visualising.

I'm off to have some nightmare now. Ta.



Your reply here?

The Cellar Image of the Day is just a section of a larger web community: a bunch of interesting folks talking about everything. Add your two cents to IotD by joining the Cellar.