Visit the Cellar!

The Cellar Image of the Day is just a section of a larger web community: bright folks talking about everything. The Cellar is the original coffeeshop with no coffee and no shop. Founded in 1990, The Cellar is one of the oldest communities on the net. Join us at the table if you like!

 
What's IotD?

The interesting, amazing, or mind-boggling images of our days.

IotD Stuff

ARCHIVES - over 13 years of IotD!
About IotD
RSS2
XML

Permalink Latest Image

Sept 21st, 2017: Robo-Bee

Recent Images

Sept 20th, 2017: Manhattan Gluten
Sept 19th, 2017: Fireworks
Sept 16th, 2017: Cute Paws
Sept 17th, 2017: Kauri Dam
Sept 16th, 2017; Tiny House
Sept 15th, 2017: First American Planetarium
Sept 14th, 2017: Swings

The CELLAR Tip Mug
Some folks who have noticed IotD

Neatorama
Worth1000
Mental Floss
Boing Boing
Switched
W3streams
GruntDoc's Blog
No Quarters
Making Light
darrenbarefoot.com
GromBlog
b3ta
Church of the Whale Penis
UniqueDaily.com
Sailor Coruscant
Projectionist

Link to us and we will try to find you after many months!

Common image haunts

Astro Pic of the Day
Earth Sci Pic of the Day
We Make Money Not Art
Spluch
ochevidec.net
Strange New Products
Geisha Asobi Blog
Cute animals blog (in Russian)
20minutos.es
Yahoo Most Emailed

Please avoid copyrighted images (or get permission) when posting!

Advertising

Philadelphia Pawn Shop
The best real estate agent in Montgomery County
The best T.38 Fax provider
Epps Beverages and Beer, Limerick, PA
Sal's Pizza, Elkins Park
Burholme Auto Body, Philadelphia
Coles Tobacco, Pottstown
ERM Auto Service, Glenside
Glenside Collision
Moorehead Catering, Trappe
Salon 153, Bala
Dominicks Auto Body, Phoenixville

   xoxoxoBruce  Tuesday Jan 24 11:37 PM

Jan 25th, 2017: Hobo Nickels

We've seen hobo nickels before, coins carved by the hobos during the Great Depression then sold or traded for food/shelter.



The custom pretty much died out during/after WW II, but a few engravers have kept the tradition alive.



LINK



SPUCK  Wednesday Jan 25 05:32 AM

WOW. That's some quality engravings.



Griff  Wednesday Jan 25 07:18 AM

I wonder what the carved with? The metal is soft so maybe a needle?



Snakeadelic  Wednesday Jan 25 08:49 AM

Griff, try an image search (I used Google) with the words antique engraving tools. No quote marks. LOTS of photos of old tool sets, many of which look like they could have been duplicated by a handyman with a few scraps of metal, wood, and ingenuity. Many of the antique tools, even in the tiny little preview pix, look like their handles were repurposed from other tools, doorknobs, or just scrap wood. That kind of repurposing is familiar to me in a highly personal context--when I worked for the sword-maker, if a tool such as a hoof rasp file or circular saw blade broke, it got recycled. My skinning knife (which I call Hensbane) is one such recycled item. The drop-tip leaf blade (ideal for not nicking the guts when "unzipping" a dead critter) was cut from an L6 tool steel circular saw blade that had thrown a couple of teeth. Its handle originally belonged to a huge rasp file that snapped in half when one of the horses (they had like 20) threw a fit while getting its hooves filed and ended up stepping on the file blade. I've had that knife 20 years now and have used it on fish, birds, rabbits, deer, sheep, and one very LARGE snake. So back during the Depression when food and work were hard to come by but free time wasn't, any scrap that could be repurposed would be, and a lot of 'drifters' had all the time they needed to teach themselves whittling, carving, and engraving techniques that could be practiced on found materials and in small quantities.



xoxoxoBruce  Wednesday Jan 25 10:08 AM

The link in the OP shows some of his tools.



glatt  Wednesday Jan 25 10:34 AM

He's selling all of these on E-bay.

And if you search Hobo Nickles on E-Bay there are tons of them available. Varying quality ad some are carved for you after you pay, so you don't know what you are getting.



BigV  Wednesday Jan 25 10:51 AM

Those are really beautiful!

I am slightly interested in doing something like that but I feel I'm too blunt a tool for such delicate work.



Diaphone Jim  Wednesday Jan 25 12:20 PM

in spite of warnings that defacing coins is a Federal offense, it has been common for years, with engraving, drilling and, of course, flattening on railroad tracks.
The last one was especially fun (and cheap) with pennies and massively heavy steam locomotives even though your mother had three or four reasons why you were forbidden to do so.
Earlier purer and softer metal coins were easier to work with.
On the month-long boat trip to Vietnam in 1966, silver quarters were still in circulation and bored troops discovered that the steel spoons from the mess hall (or whatever the Navy called it) could be used to hammer the quarters into various shapes including rings.
It took a lot of hammering and the process was far from quiet. After a couple of weeks of constant ding-ding-ding, the fad thankfully died out.



sexobon  Wednesday Jan 25 06:29 PM

A lot could be done with the old silver coins.

Here's a WWII era canteen cap made from a re-punched Australian Florin that's currently selling on eBay:

Attachment 59240Attachment 59241



xoxoxoBruce  Wednesday Jan 25 08:33 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by Diaphone Jim View Post
in spite of warnings that defacing coins is a Federal offense, it has been common for years, with engraving, drilling and, of course, flattening on railroad tracks.
Actually the law says it's illegal to try and spend a defaced coin, not deface it.
Quote:
On the month-long boat trip to Vietnam in 1966, silver quarters were still in circulation and bored troops discovered that the steel spoons from the mess hall (or whatever the Navy called it) could be used to hammer the quarters into various shapes including rings.
It took a lot of hammering and the process was far from quiet. After a couple of weeks of constant ding-ding-ding, the fad thankfully died out.
Ha ha, that was going on in my dorm('62-'63) and it echoed like a bitch, I imagine shipboard would be intolerable.
I'd go to the empty auditorium late at night to work on mine.


Griff  Thursday Jan 26 07:48 AM

Quote:
Originally Posted by Snakeadelic View Post
Griff, try an image search (I used Google) with the words antique engraving tools. No quote marks. LOTS of photos of old tool sets, many of which look like they could have been duplicated by a handyman with a few scraps of metal, wood, and ingenuity. Many of the antique tools, even in the tiny little preview pix, look like their handles were repurposed from other tools, doorknobs, or just scrap wood. That kind of repurposing is familiar to me in a highly personal context--when I worked for the sword-maker, if a tool such as a hoof rasp file or circular saw blade broke, it got recycled. My skinning knife (which I call Hensbane) is one such recycled item. The drop-tip leaf blade (ideal for not nicking the guts when "unzipping" a dead critter) was cut from an L6 tool steel circular saw blade that had thrown a couple of teeth. Its handle originally belonged to a huge rasp file that snapped in half when one of the horses (they had like 20) threw a fit while getting its hooves filed and ended up stepping on the file blade. I've had that knife 20 years now and have used it on fish, birds, rabbits, deer, sheep, and one very LARGE snake. So back during the Depression when food and work were hard to come by but free time wasn't, any scrap that could be repurposed would be, and a lot of 'drifters' had all the time they needed to teach themselves whittling, carving, and engraving techniques that could be practiced on found materials and in small quantities.
Thanks!


Diaphone Jim  Thursday Jan 26 12:17 PM

While defacing coins is not a federal offense, warnings of such have long been common.



xoxoxoBruce  Thursday Jan 26 01:16 PM

Oh yes, I nailed some pennies to the wall in my uncles barn and he went off like Eliot Ness was gonna gun us down any minute. Probably because he'd always been told that since he was a kid

It wasn't until we got into the spoon beaten coins that a couple of class nerds did some checking. God bless 'em, before Google they were invaluable.



xoxoxoBruce  Wednesday Mar 22 10:26 PM

I ran across a kickstarter today where this guy is going to stamp imitation Hobo Nickels. I'm not going to post the link because I have mixed feelings about kickstarters, but Google will find it easy enough.



Evidently he's planning on dozens of designs. They would make interest material for making jewelry and stuff.



Your reply here?

The Cellar Image of the Day is just a section of a larger web community: a bunch of interesting folks talking about everything. Add your two cents to IotD by joining the Cellar.