Visit the Cellar!

The Cellar Image of the Day is just a section of a larger web community: bright folks talking about everything. The Cellar is the original coffeeshop with no coffee and no shop. Founded in 1990, The Cellar is one of the oldest communities on the net. Join us at the table if you like!

 
What's IotD?

The interesting, amazing, or mind-boggling images of our days.

IotD Stuff

ARCHIVES - over 13 years of IotD!
About IotD
RSS2
XML

Permalink Latest Image

Apr 29th, 2017: Lying Real Estate Agents

Recent Images

Apr 28th, 2017: White Raven
Apr 27th, 2017: Bioluminescent Sea Critters
Apr 25th, 2017: Embroidery
Apr 24th, 2017: Money Laundering
April 23rd, 2017: Philadelphia Lottery
April 22nd, 2017: The Weed Nuns
Apr 21st, 2017: Cretors' Wagon

The CELLAR Tip Mug
Some folks who have noticed IotD

Neatorama
Worth1000
Mental Floss
Boing Boing
Switched
W3streams
GruntDoc's Blog
No Quarters
Making Light
darrenbarefoot.com
GromBlog
b3ta
Church of the Whale Penis
UniqueDaily.com
Sailor Coruscant
Projectionist

Link to us and we will try to find you after many months!

Common image haunts

Astro Pic of the Day
Earth Sci Pic of the Day
We Make Money Not Art
Spluch
ochevidec.net
Strange New Products
Geisha Asobi Blog
Cute animals blog (in Russian)
20minutos.es
Yahoo Most Emailed

Please avoid copyrighted images (or get permission) when posting!

Advertising

Philadelphia Pawn Shop
The best real estate agent in Montgomery County
The best T.38 Fax provider
Epps Beverages and Beer, Limerick, PA
Sal's Pizza, Elkins Park
Burholme Auto Body, Philadelphia
Coles Tobacco, Pottstown
ERM Auto Service, Glenside
Glenside Collision
Moorehead Catering, Trappe
Salon 153, Bala
Dominicks Auto Body, Phoenixville

   xoxoxoBruce  Wednesday Jan 25 11:34 PM

Jan 26th, 2017: Fred and Myrtle’s Shell House

You know, Fred and Myrtle, you must remember them... unless you're not from New Zealand.

Quote:
Back in the 1960s when the Flutey’s were living in Bluff – a tiny town of around 1,850 residents in the
lowest corner of the South Island of New Zealand. At that time Fred was working at the harbour and
would collect Pāua shells for manufacturers and returned servicemen. After getting rid of what he could,
Fred then cleaned up the unwanted shells and took them home to add to the growing pile in the couple’s
living room.


Now Myrtle was an understand wife, appreciating the beauty and Fred's hard work, but she was still a woman,
and the housekeeper. When moving all this crap to clean got to be too much, instead of freaking out on Fred
to get this crap out of the house, she took a box of 4" nails and started nailing them to the walls.



Before long folks started dropping by to see the display. I grew up in a town that size and believe me,
everyone knew about it. Then the word spread and people started coming from further away. Fred and Myrtle
loved having company and showing off the house. Myrtle started getting up at six AM to have the house
spick & span by 9. Of course politicians, the tourist board and celebrities wanted to be associated with such
popular people, which increased their fame even more.

Fred passed away in 2001, (Myrtle preceded him, probably from overwork), and the house went to a Grandson
who didn't want the hassle of keeping the house open but didn't want to see the collection broken up.
His solution, which didn't set well with some locals, was to donate the collection to the Museum of Canterbury
which was hundreds of miles away.
To their credit the museum duplicated much of the house.



Quote:
More than 4000 original items were taken from the house to include in the exhibit including the carpet,
a Lions Club Banner which hung over the doorway, the house number from the outside fence, and the
large concrete Pāua shell which stood in the centre of the lounge.


Link
I spent way too much time on this but I liked the story.


xoxoxoBruce  Wednesday Jan 25 11:36 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by xoxoxoBruce View Post
You know, Fred and Myrtle, you must remember them... unless you're not from New Zealand.




Now Myrtle was an understand wife, appreciating the beauty and Fred's hard work, but she was still a woman, and the housekeeper. When moving all this crap to clean got to be too much, instead of freaking out on Fred to get this crap out of the house, she took a box of 4" nails and started nailing them to the walls.



Before long folks started dropping by to see the display. I grew up in a town that size and believe me, everyone knew about it. Then the word spread and people started coming from further away. Fred and Myrtle loved having company and showing off the house. Myrtle started getting up at six AM to have the house spick & span by 9. Of course politicians, the tourist board and celebrities wanted to be associated with such popular people, which increased their fame even more.

Fred passed away in 2001, (Myrtle preceded him, probably from overwork), and the house went to a Grandson who didn't want the hassle of keeping the house open but didn't want to see the collection broken up.His solution, which didn't set well with some locals, was to donate the collection to the Museum of Canterbury which was hundreds of miles away.
To their credit the museum duplicated much of the house.



Quote:
More than 4000 original items were taken from the house to include in the exhibit including the carpet, a Lions Club Banner which hung over the doorway, the house number from the outside fence, and the large concrete Pāua shell which stood in the centre of the lounge.


Link
I spent way too much time on this but I liked the story.



Snakeadelic  Thursday Jan 26 08:25 AM

Considering that a complete, polished paua shell like those can go for $25 at a scrawny, undergrown 4-5" across its longest dimension, I can only hope the museum paid at least half what those enormous antiques are worth! Seriously--paua is uniquely vivid (the color isn't from dyes) among abalone species, collection is now tightly controlled, I think most of what's on the market is farmed, and those pictured include some HUGE specimens that look to be 10-12" at their longest dimension! Good thing Fred & Myrtle missed the huge interest & commensurate price surge, or that collection would've been parted out years ago.



classicman  Thursday Jan 26 09:01 AM

Damn, those are gorgeous!



xoxoxoBruce  Thursday Jan 26 09:42 AM

Quote:
Originally Posted by Snakeadelic View Post
... I can only hope the museum paid at least half what those enormous antiques are worth!
I don't believe they paid anything for the collection, however, they went to considerable trouble and expense to create the permanent exhibit and satisfy the donor.


Gravdigr  Thursday Jan 26 01:48 PM

A story so nice, he posted it twice.



blueboy56  Thursday Jan 26 02:01 PM

Hm.. Maybe I could do something similar with my collection of coffee mugs.



xoxoxoBruce  Thursday Jan 26 05:17 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by Gravdigr View Post
A story so nice, he posted it twice.
What? Oh fuck. I set it up and previewed, but when I posted it the spacing was screwed up, so I edited it. At least I thought I edited it, didn't notice I duplicated it. Just read the second one.
Oh well, it was 11:30 and I'd been working on it for two and a half hours, so you're lucky it wasn't later because it might have been unreadable.
I sure Fred and Myrtle would get a chuckle out of my dundering.


Gravdigr  Thursday Jan 26 05:27 PM

Ol' Fred, he sold sea shells by the sea shore.



xoxoxoBruce  Thursday Jan 26 10:10 PM

Jan 27th, 2017: Asian Cookies

We've seen plenty of fake foods, some which look better than the real thing, that they use for display in
restaurants and advertisements. Well here's a different wrinkle, the sumptuous looking Japanese dishes
aren't fake, per se, they are cookies.




Quote:
Masako, an Osaka-based mother and baker extraordinaire, creates cookies inspired by Japanese cuisine.
While the tiny treats may look like mini meals, they’re actually simple sugar cookies topped with intricately
sculpted icing.

To cook up each entrée, Masako first bakes a biscuit to use as the bowl, plate, or tray. She then molds
each food item out of icing, using a wide range of colors, textures, and even opacity to capture the diversity
of each dish.
From slippery soba noodles and crispy tempura to rainbow rows of sushi and cloudy miso soup, each petite
plate looks good enough to eat—both as a savory dinner and a sweet treat!
She sure is good at what she does, I'm not sure how viewing a savory dish then biting into sugar would be?

link


Your reply here?

The Cellar Image of the Day is just a section of a larger web community: a bunch of interesting folks talking about everything. Add your two cents to IotD by joining the Cellar.