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   xoxoxoBruce  Thursday Mar 9 10:30 PM

Mar 10th, 2017: Grime’s Graves

Grime’s Graves is a pock marked section in Thetford Forest in Norfolk, England. I don’t know who the hell Grime is, but he’s
probably hiding from a lynch mob because there’s no graves. What is there is the remnants of over 400 holes in the earth where
flint was mined, starting at least 4500 years ago, around the same time the Druids were erecting monuments at Stonehenge and
at Avebury.

Of course we all know the purpose of flint is cutting, slashing, stabbing, skinning, maiming, and butchering, as well as lighting up
your musket or Zippo.



The flint runs in seams through the chalk strata, so every year or two they’d dig a pit more than 14 meters(46 ft) deep and
12 meters(39.4ft) across at the surface, using antlers for picks and wooden shovels. They’d dump the diggings in last years pit.
At the bottom lateral tunnels followed the flint seams because after digging that hole they wanted to grab as much flint as they
could. In the tunnels light came from lamps made by scooping out hollows in the chalk walls and filling them with animal fat or
oil and floating wicks, Must have been pungent.



Quote:
It is estimated that a medium-depth shaft could have yielded as much as 60 tons of flint nodules that could have produced
as many as 10,000 polished stone axes. Extrapolation across the site suggests that Grime's Graves may have produced
around 16-18,000 tons of flint across the 433 shafts recorded to date. Mining continued at Grime’s Graves until about
1400 BC. In this later period, the pits became shallower and lacked underground galleries.
Investigating the mines they discovered the pits were also used to dispose of archaeologist’s-boner inducing neolithic rubbish,
and an occasional body.

link


Carruthers  Friday Mar 10 04:06 AM

Quote:
Grime’s Graves is a pock marked section in Thetford Forest in Norfolk, England. I don’t know who the hell Grime is, but he’s
probably hiding from a lynch mob because there’s no graves.
I believe that Grime, or more often Grim, is another name for the Devil, although that is often disputed.

From Wiki:

Quote:
Grim's Ditch, Grim's Dyke (also Grimsdyke or Grimes Dike in derivative names) or Grim's Bank is a name shared by a number of prehistoric bank and ditch earthworks.
Enigmatic in both their naming and original function, examples are found across the chalk uplands of southern England
LINK


xoxoxoBruce  Friday Mar 10 09:53 AM

OK, then Grime should be Grim.
Grim is the Devil.
The Grimms were brothers.
So the Devil is a Bro.
Cool.



Flint  Friday Mar 10 02:04 PM

I had no idea this type of flint-mining existed. I'm going to ask dad and uncle if they've ever seen anything like this.

The flint tools from Texas are made from pieces of flint you could easily find near the top of the ground, especially after it rains, or the fields have been plowed. I suppose, if larger pieces are further down, and if the Native Americans had looked further down, they would have had larger tools?



DanaC  Friday Mar 10 04:38 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by Carruthers View Post
I believe that Grime, or more often Grim, is another name for the Devil, although that is often disputed.

From Wiki:



LINK
Grimnir was another name for Woden/Odin as well in Norse mythology - a lot of places in the north (what was the Danelaw) have Grim in them.

Quote:

Grimsby was settled by Danes sometime in the 9th century AD. According to legend, the name Grimsby derives from the name Grim, a Danish fisherman,[10] the suffix -by being the Old Norse word for village. The legendary founding of Grimsby is described in Lay of Havelock the Dane, but historians consider this account to be myth.
In Norse mythology, Grim (Mask) and Grimnir (Masked One) are names adopted by the deity Odin (Anglo-Saxon Woden) when travelling incognito amongst mortals, as in the short poem known as 'Grimnir's Sayings' (Grimnismal) in the Poetic Edda.[11] The intended audience of the Havelock tale (recorded much later in the form of The Lay of Havelock the Dane) may have understood the fisherman Grim to be Odin in disguise. The Odinic name 'Grimr/Grim' occurs in many English placenames within the historical Danelaw and elsewhere in Britain, examples being the numerous earthworks named Grimsdyke.[12] As other British placenames containing the element Grim are explained as referring to Woden/Odin (e.g. Grimsbury, Grimspound, Grime's Graves, Grimsditch, Grimsworne), Grimsby is likely to have the same derivation.
Grimsby is listed in the Domesday Book as having a population of around 200, a priest, a mill and a ferry.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Grimsby


But then, they do say it's grim up north.


footfootfoot  Friday Mar 10 09:47 PM

Is that an archeologist's boner in your pocket or are you...Oh. Never mind.



blueboy56  Friday Mar 10 10:18 PM

Please, please, please. Somebody that knows how to do it, link in photos of the Mima Mounds in Washington state. They are the opposite of these dips. Thank you ever so much.



Carruthers  Sunday Mar 12 07:05 AM

Flint weapons and tools having long since disappeared from the catalogue, flint became a building material.
Brick and flint houses can be seen all over south and east England and are still being built today.
These old cottages are in Norfolk on the same chalk belt as Thetford, above.

Attachment 59741

Many of these buildings will be in conservation areas so repairs and renovations will have to be made using original materials.
New houses tend to look a bit stark, but there's nothing that a couple of centuries of weathering won't put right.

Very much in FWIW territory, but when researching my family history I found one strand of my family had the surname Flint.
I traced them back into deepest Yorkshire in 1770.



xoxoxoBruce  Sunday Mar 12 12:40 PM

Your contributions are always worth reading.
Condolences on the Flint in the family tree.



Happy Monkey  Monday Mar 13 02:37 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by Carruthers View Post
I believe that Grime, or more often Grim, is another name for the Devil, although that is often disputed.
Quote:
Originally Posted by DanaC View Post
Grimnir was another name for Woden/Odin as well in Norse mythology
Could be both. Early (and, perhaps, not so early) Christianity labeled competing pantheons as demons, and Odin, as the boss, could have been linked to the Devil.


fargon  Monday Mar 13 03:21 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by Carruthers View Post

Very much in FWIW territory, but when researching my family history I found one strand of my family had the surname Flint.
I traced them back into deepest Yorkshire in 1770.
Our Man Flint.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lQwJQkEh2QY


Gravdigr  Monday Mar 13 04:28 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by Flint View Post
The flint tools from Texas...
Is that what they call you guys?





Relax, man, I'm just poking ya.


BigV  Tuesday Mar 14 11:34 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by blueboy56 View Post
Please, please, please. Somebody that knows how to do it, link in photos of the Mima Mounds in Washington state. They are the opposite of these dips. Thank you ever so much.
Grimes and Mina sitting in a field
One pressed down and the other did yield.
First come flints then gopher-zillas.
What's going on with these turfed-over ripples?
One side's dimples and the other's all pimples.


xoxoxoBruce  Wednesday Mar 15 12:19 AM

That reminds me, where the hell is blueboy56? I made a whole thread for him, rush rush, set aside what I had prepared, and he doesn't show up.
I wonder if he has a financial interest in Mima Mounds?
Then again, maybe somebody kidnapped his sainted mother until he got Mima Mounds posted?

Just kidding, he'll be back, they all come back after UT's koolaid.



blueboy56  Saturday Mar 18 12:12 PM

Again sorry for the delay. I was doing reasearch by jumping up and down on the mounds, then looking on google maps to see of any of the Grimey holes poked out.



footfootfoot  Thursday Mar 23 03:23 PM

I wonder if the Gypsum in Nova Scotia is related to the White cliffs of Dover? Were they once attached at the lip, as it were, back in the Pangaea days?



DanaC  Thursday Mar 23 05:55 PM

Quote:
The cliffs themselves were formed at the same time as the Strait of Dover, by ice-age floods.
The cliffs are mainly soft white chalk with a very fine-grained texture, composed primarily of coccoliths, plates of calcium carbonate formed by coccolithophores, single-celled planktonic algae whose skeletal remains sank to the bottom of the ocean during the Cretaceous and, together with the remains of bottom-living creatures, formed sediments. Flint and quartz are also found in the chalk.[8] White cliffs like those of Dover are also found on the Danish islands of Mřn and Langeland and the island of Rügen in Germany. The chalk cliffs of the Alabaster Coast of Normandy, France, are part of the same geological system as Dover's cliffs.



SPUCK  Friday Mar 24 04:22 AM

Mima Mounds



Flint house? Doesn't flint give off a pungent smell when it gets wet?



BigV  Friday Mar 24 12:57 PM

Did you just call Flint a dog?!



xoxoxoBruce  Friday Mar 24 03:38 PM

No, he called him a smelly wet one.



footfootfoot  Friday Mar 24 04:12 PM

Well. there you have it. Near where I once lived in CT, there is a rock outcropping right next to the street that has been identified as having its other half in Africa.

http://www.cttrips.com/pages/ctgeotrips51905.html

http://chriswoodside.com/does-bit-africa-sit-deep-river

Quote:
A rock outcropping next to the town's ball field marks the spot where two continents crashed together 250 million years ago. When the land masses began to pull apart again, a hunk of what might have become Africa remained clinging to North America. Deep River is one of the few places where the ''suture line'' can be viewed.
For a long time, millions of years, in fact, the suture was not visible. Then, a few years ago, a Boy Scout troop and the Deep River Land Trust joined to dig a trench across the central part of the rock ledge, which is right along Route 154 at the entrance to Devitt Field. They removed several inches of dirt that had been deposited on top of most of the ridge during the last Ice Age about 18,000 years ago. When they were done, a band of rock lay exposed.
Did not pee there, however.


Flint  Friday Mar 24 04:15 PM

Hey!



SPUCK  Friday Mar 24 08:51 PM

snicker



xoxoxoBruce  Friday Mar 24 09:38 PM

Quote:
A rock outcropping next to the town's ball field marks the spot where two continents crashed together 250 million years ago. When the land masses began to pull apart again, a hunk of what might have become Africa remained clinging to North America.
Nice try, but the Earth is only 7,000 years old.


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