Visit the Cellar!

The Cellar Image of the Day is just a section of a larger web community: bright folks talking about everything. The Cellar is the original coffeeshop with no coffee and no shop. Founded in 1990, The Cellar is one of the oldest communities on the net. Join us at the table if you like!

 
What's IotD?

The interesting, amazing, or mind-boggling images of our days.

IotD Stuff

ARCHIVES - over 13 years of IotD!
About IotD
RSS2
XML

Permalink Latest Image

Sept 25th, 2018: Blown Glass Utility Art

Recent Images

Sept 24th, 2018: Cartoon Café
Sept 23rd, 2018: Vardo
Sept 22nd, 2018: Fish Bunker
Sept 21st, 2018: Beaded Chief's Top Hat
Sept 20th, 2018: KLM Armalite
Sept 19th, 2018: Rocks vs Gravity
Sept 18th, 2018: Security Issue

The CELLAR Tip Mug
Some folks who have noticed IotD

Neatorama
Worth1000
Mental Floss
Boing Boing
Switched
W3streams
GruntDoc's Blog
No Quarters
Making Light
darrenbarefoot.com
GromBlog
b3ta
Church of the Whale Penis
UniqueDaily.com
Sailor Coruscant
Projectionist

Link to us and we will try to find you after many months!

Common image haunts

Astro Pic of the Day
Earth Sci Pic of the Day
We Make Money Not Art
Spluch
ochevidec.net
Strange New Products
Geisha Asobi Blog
Cute animals blog (in Russian)
20minutos.es
Yahoo Most Emailed

Please avoid copyrighted images (or get permission) when posting!

Advertising

Philadelphia Pawn Shop
The best real estate agent in Montgomery County
The best T.38 Fax provider
Epps Beverages and Beer, Limerick, PA
Sal's Pizza, Elkins Park
Burholme Auto Body, Philadelphia
Coles Tobacco, Pottstown
ERM Auto Service, Glenside
Glenside Collision
Moorehead Catering, Trappe
Salon 153, Bala
Dominicks Auto Body, Phoenixville

   xoxoxoBruce  Friday Mar 9 10:49 PM

March 10th, 2018: Ruby Loftus

Ruby Loftus became Britain’s Rosie the Riveter, on posters throughout the war.
It started with this Laura Knight painting, commissioned by The War Artists' Advisory Committee to recruit more women to ordnance factories.

Quote:
It was painted in the Royal Ordnance Factory in Newport, South Wales, and shows a young woman, Ruby Loftus, performing a highly skilled piece of work on an industrial lathe. The component being worked is the breech ring of a double-barrelled, anti-aircraft gun designed to fire twenty rounds per minute. Any lack of precision in forming the breech ring could result in the gun being destroyed when fired. In peace-time this task would only be performed by a man with eight or nine years' experience but the 21-year-old Loftus mastered the technique after only a year or two of training.


The painting is titled, “Ruby Loftus Screwing a Breech Ring” and I have a problem with that.
She’s obviously boring the ring, maybe she’ll cut an internal thread later but not in the painting.
Maybe they called it that to convince women if they work in ordnance they’ll get a little.
Or maybe like everything in Britain during the war, the terms were meant to obfuscate reality for spys.
The other things are no glasses and she should have one hand on the carriage feed lever at this point.

But Ruby was really screwing Lance Corporal John Green whom she married that year.
She became an oxymoron… Ruby Green.

link


newtimer  Saturday Mar 10 11:05 AM

Ah, the good old days before safety goggles. But all of the women DO have hairnets, so at least a hair won't fall onto a piece of machinery and damage it.



gozar  Saturday Mar 10 03:26 PM

Ruby Green? Did she emigrate to Canada and give birth to a son named Red?



xoxoxoBruce  Saturday Mar 10 07:00 PM

Yes, they moved to British Columbia but don't know if they had kids.



Griff  Sunday Mar 11 09:32 AM

Quote:
Originally Posted by gozar View Post
Ruby Green? Did she emigrate to Canada and give birth to a son named Red?
I haven't seen that in forever.



Carruthers  Sunday Mar 11 10:10 AM

A modern version of that painting would have a German or Japanese lathe at its centre.

How times change.



Griff  Sunday Mar 11 10:34 AM

Now we have American Nazis agitating in France, strange times.



xoxoxoBruce  Sunday Mar 11 05:49 PM

Putin's puppets are everywhere.



Leus  Tuesday Mar 13 03:05 PM

With a custom tool she may be cutting threads. Brits are weird, perhaps they called this operation "screwing" back in the day.

Goggles? Real machinists need no bloody goggles.

Yes, both hands are in the wrong place.

Oh, the hairnet is for keeping your scalp in place.

Beautiful painting, yeah?



glatt  Tuesday Mar 13 04:14 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by Leus View Post
Yes, both hands are in the wrong place.
I wasn't paying attention to that, but now it bugs me. Poser. Like GWB in a flight suit.


Carruthers  Tuesday Mar 13 04:57 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by Leus View Post
Brits are weird...
I think that you mean enigmatic or engagingly eccentric.


Happy Monkey  Tuesday Mar 13 06:31 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by glatt View Post
I wasn't paying attention to that, but now it bugs me. Poser. Like GWB in a flight suit.
Could be a 'poser', like when a scientist is told to look more sciencey by a photographer, and holds a test tube even though they're an astrophysicist.


xoxoxoBruce  Tuesday Mar 13 10:34 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by Leus View Post
With a custom tool she may be cutting threads. Brits are weird, perhaps they called this operation "screwing" back in the day.
I figured they might call tread cutting screwing, but in the painting she is not cutting threads.
I think the thread cutting bit may be shown sitting behind the turret toward the tailstock.


Thunder.gryphoN  Wednesday Mar 14 12:37 AM

Machinist here. Clicking through to the source image shows a much higher resolution and clearly shows to me a very coarse thread or grooving inside the bore, likely what would have been a buttress or trapezoidal thread (very common on large guns because of strength characteristics). The swarf (chips/cuttings) in the bore and on the machine are very similar to what actually results with single-point threading, with large width that's along the axis of the cut and high stiffness that keeps the chip relatively straight. The thread cutting tool tip itself is hidden from view, it would be on the left side of the tool holder in the turret. The controls for feed for threading would be out of view below her right hand, and it is possible that after engaging the cut, she is leaning forward to get a better look at the tool position while it is far away from the end and she doesn't need to disengage the feed for some time still. My verdict is that the description is plausible and accurate. (for reference, I have attached a photo showing how a threading operation chip looks like)



xoxoxoBruce  Wednesday Mar 14 12:43 PM

Still don’t think she’s “screwing”, just boring, maybe in advance of “screwing” a buttress (breech-lock) thread, but the trapezoidal is metric.
Ah…

Quote:
The British Army had first examined the weapon when they received a number of Polish-built examples in 1937 for testing, known as the "QF 40 mm Mark I" (QF standing for "quick firing"), or "Mark I/2" after a minor change to the flash hider. A licence was acquired and the gun was converted from metric to imperial measurements. They also made numerous changes to the design to make it more suitable for mass production, as the original Bofors design was intended to be hand-assembled, and many parts were labeled "file to fit on assembly", requiring many man-hours of work to complete.
I highly doubt Ruby had carbide inserts.


Gravdigr  Wednesday Mar 14 01:47 PM

The exact technical term you are looking for is "turning something on a fucking lathe".



Carruthers  Wednesday Mar 14 01:58 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by Gravdigr View Post
The exact technical term you are looking for is "turning something on a fucking lathe".
Bravo Mr G! Brevity is all!


xoxoxoBruce  Wednesday Mar 14 08:24 PM

But inside it's not turning it's boring.



Gravdigr  Saturday Mar 17 04:25 PM

Ever seen anyone bore a bowl on a lathe?



xoxoxoBruce  Sunday Mar 18 02:39 AM

I'm a machinist, I don't make bowls. Neither did Ruby.



Carruthers  Sunday Apr 1 08:43 AM

Seeking some respite from the endless hedonism that is my lot in life, I turned to the book review section of this morning's Sunday Times.

Behemoth: A History of the Factory and the Making of the Modern World by Joshua B Freeman was featured and illustrated by this image.

Attachment 63541
On her metal: a machinist at an aircraft factory, 1942

Very much in FWIW territory I know, but I've included it as, unlike the painting, it probably isn't open to interpretation.

Over to you, Dwellars.

Link



xoxoxoBruce  Sunday Apr 1 01:41 PM

That was taken by Alfred Palmer in October of '42 at Douglas in Long Beach.
He took several pictures almost the same but slightly different elevations.
Fascinating specialized boring machine.
I HATE PINTEREST.



Your reply here?

The Cellar Image of the Day is just a section of a larger web community: a bunch of interesting folks talking about everything. Add your two cents to IotD by joining the Cellar.