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   xoxoxoBruce  Friday Sep 13 12:20 AM

Sept 13th, 2019 : Stonewall

No, not the NYC Gay riots drag queen Marsha Johnson started against being harassed at the Stonewall Inn.
The 100,000 miles(161,000 km) of stonewalls in the New England woods, which would go around the Earth four times, and is
down from 250,000 miles(402,000 km and 400 million tons) in the 1850s. Now most are out of sight out of mind to most people,
but traversing any New England woods you’re likely to stumble on several walls, anywhere from knee high to waist high.
New England farmers were not stone craftsmen pining for walls, the reason every field was lined with stone is to get them the hell
out of the way. Stones are a winter crop, they are plentiful every damn spring and have to be moved to plow, harrow and plant.



New Hampshire has a project going to crowdsource the locations.

Quote:
Through an interactive interface known as the New Hampshire Stone Wall Mapper, interested parties can map the plethora of walls from the resulting aerial imagery. The platform allows anyone with a computer and internet access to trace the walls right onto LiDAR images. Once complete, users can input where a given structure is located, along with any observations about the wall’s condition. You can also upload images. It then appears on the main map as a pink line, containing all the relevant information.

Quote:
DES state geologist Rick Chormann also hopes that people will take the time to write about their personal experiences with the wall they mapped.
Uh, sure... well this here wall was built with the stones used by an angry mob to stone Granny to death for not putting salt pork in the
baked beans for the church supper. It were a real pain in the butt picking up all them stones ‘cause Granny’s blood made ‘em slippery.


link

link


Carruthers  Friday Sep 13 06:18 AM

Dry stone walls are very much part of the agricultural landscape in several parts of the UK and the counties of Northumberland, Durham, North Yorkshire and Cumbria spring to mind.

There are few trees so stock proof hedging is a non-starter as is wooden fencing. The stone walls provide a degree of shelter from wind but they do require a fair degree of upkeep.

This is Stainmore in Cumbria, close to the borders of Durham and North Yorkshire.

Attachment 68680

Streetview Link.

Link



Griff  Friday Sep 13 07:08 AM

NEPA sold her walls to the fancy people. Now folks are building walls.



glatt  Friday Sep 13 07:43 AM

Quote:
Originally Posted by Griff View Post
NEPA sold her walls to the fancy people. Now folks are building walls.


Yeah, that made me sad. I loved the stone walls everywhere in NEPA.


xoxoxoBruce  Friday Sep 13 10:05 AM

Quote:
Originally Posted by Carruthers View Post
Dry stone walls are very much part of the agricultural landscape in several parts of the UK and the counties of Northumberland, Durham, North Yorkshire and Cumbria spring to mind.

There are few trees so stock proof hedging is a non-starter as is wooden fencing. The stone walls provide a degree of shelter from wind but they do require a fair degree of upkeep.
Yes, a lot of upkeep with that type of wall, purpose built to contain livestock it has to be higher than you'd typically find in New England. It's also much thinner than our walls so any movement by any stone has consequences for the walls integrity. English walls were built, whereas New England walls grew.


captainhook455  Friday Sep 13 09:43 PM

Back when I lived in Jersey I would take the commuter plane out of Atlantic City to Philly once a month. Winter was the best time to see old roads, walls and revolutionary fortifications. On the Jersey side is of the Delaware River across from the airport are small stone fortifications big enough for a couple cannons facing the river. River access would be the only way to see it up close as there was no road through the swamp behind it. I'm sure there were others, but that is what I could see from the plane.

Sent from my moto e5 supra using Tapatalk



blueboy56  Friday Sep 13 09:53 PM

There appears to be parallel lines running from upper left to lower right.
Are they due to glacier action or something else. (Like giants sledding down from Canada.)



xoxoxoBruce  Friday Sep 13 10:31 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by captainhook455 View Post
On the Jersey side is of the Delaware River across from the airport are small stone fortifications big enough for a couple cannons facing the river.
Two 18 pounders and two 9 pounders.

Quote:
Originally Posted by blueboy56 View Post
There appears to be parallel lines running from upper left to lower right.
Are they due to glacier action or something else. (Like giants sledding down from Canada.)
Yes, glacier tracks.


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