Visit the Cellar!

The Cellar Image of the Day is just a section of a larger web community: bright folks talking about everything. The Cellar is the original coffeeshop with no coffee and no shop. Founded in 1990, The Cellar is one of the oldest communities on the net. Join us at the table if you like!

 
What's IotD?

The interesting, amazing, or mind-boggling images of our days.

IotD Stuff

ARCHIVES - over 13 years of IotD!
About IotD
RSS2
XML

Permalink Latest Image

June 24th, 2017: North American Food

Recent Images

June 23rd, 2017: Moist Towelettes
June 22nd, 2017: Doodling
June 21st, 2017: Octopus’s Garden
June 20th, 2017: Money Slang
June 19th, 2017: French Phony
June 18th, 2017: A B C… J K L… U V War…
June 16th, 2017: Hōkūleʻa

The CELLAR Tip Mug
Some folks who have noticed IotD

Neatorama
Worth1000
Mental Floss
Boing Boing
Switched
W3streams
GruntDoc's Blog
No Quarters
Making Light
darrenbarefoot.com
GromBlog
b3ta
Church of the Whale Penis
UniqueDaily.com
Sailor Coruscant
Projectionist

Link to us and we will try to find you after many months!

Common image haunts

Astro Pic of the Day
Earth Sci Pic of the Day
We Make Money Not Art
Spluch
ochevidec.net
Strange New Products
Geisha Asobi Blog
Cute animals blog (in Russian)
20minutos.es
Yahoo Most Emailed

Please avoid copyrighted images (or get permission) when posting!

Advertising

Philadelphia Pawn Shop
The best real estate agent in Montgomery County
The best T.38 Fax provider
Epps Beverages and Beer, Limerick, PA
Sal's Pizza, Elkins Park
Burholme Auto Body, Philadelphia
Coles Tobacco, Pottstown
ERM Auto Service, Glenside
Glenside Collision
Moorehead Catering, Trappe
Salon 153, Bala
Dominicks Auto Body, Phoenixville

   Undertoad  Monday Sep 10 10:50 AM

9/10: Mountain Pine Beetle



The caption:

The towering pine trees of British Columbia's rugged Caribou Region are paying with their lives for five consecutive winters that have not been cold enough to kill a tiny predator. Thousands of trees are infested with mountain pine beetles in an exploding infestation that threatens to destroy more than C$4 billion ($2.6 billion) in timber in an area dependent on the forestry industry. The mountain pine beetles is pictured in this undated handout photo.

This relates to dhamsaic's image about genetic engineering. One aspect of GE foods/trees/pets/etc is that it encourages "monoculture" where all of the crops in a field, area, state, country, world, etc are identical species. The above bug is one reason why that's a bad idea. The potato famine, in Ireland, was the result of monoculture. A disease developed in one type of potato and because all the potatoes in Ireland were the same variety, it spread very quickly.

This is often the basic argument against GE. However, monoculture is not only the result of man's intervention nor of genetic engineering, but also of nature. Some plants are just better than others at getting copies of their DNA out there, and the forests of pine susceptible to this bug are one such example.



dave  Monday Sep 10 11:51 AM

I had to know more about this, so I went and did some quick reading. From

http://www.forestry.ubc.ca/fetch21/F...osae/pine.html (also has some decent pictures)

-- the beetles "attack" trees and lay egg "galleries" about 3 feet (90 cm) long. When the larvae hatch, they chew the hell out of the bark, "girdling" the tree. My guess is that since the bark is destroyed, nutrients cannot get to the rest of the tree, killing it.

There's also good information at

http://ext.nrs.wsu.edu/info/fhn/mtpinebt.html

but a quick search on google will show you both of those. The beetles are, at adult size, about 1/5" in length (1/2 centimeter) and are considered the most damaging bark beetle. According to the US Forestry Service, they were responsible for the destruction of nearly 300,000 trees in 1990. 1991 was even worse.

Pretty destructive little buggers...



russotto  Monday Sep 10 01:08 PM

Re: 9/10: Mountain Pine Beetle

Quote:
Originally posted by Undertoad


The caption:

The towering pine trees of British Columbia's rugged Caribou Region are paying with their lives for five consecutive winters that have not been cold enough to kill a tiny predator. Thousands of trees are infested with mountain pine beetles in an exploding infestation that threatens to destroy more than C$4 billion ($2.6 billion) in timber in an area dependent on the forestry industry. The mountain pine beetles is pictured in this undated handout photo.

This relates to dhamsaic's image about genetic engineering. One aspect of GE foods/trees/pets/etc is that it encourages "monoculture" where all of the crops in a field, area, state, country, world, etc are identical species. The above bug is one reason why that's a bad idea. The potato famine, in Ireland, was the result of monoculture. A disease developed in one type of potato and because all the potatoes in Ireland were the same variety, it spread very quickly.
Well, you don't need a monoculture to have devastation, as the chestnut blight proved. And I think GE used properly can actually reduce the dependence on monoculture which traditional breeding encourages. With genetic engineering, you can identify the specific traits you want and add them to many different species, something traditional breeding can't do. Whether it will actually be used this way is another question.


Your reply here?

The Cellar Image of the Day is just a section of a larger web community: a bunch of interesting folks talking about everything. Add your two cents to IotD by joining the Cellar.