Visit the Cellar!

The Cellar Image of the Day is just a section of a larger web community: bright folks talking about everything. The Cellar is the original coffeeshop with no coffee and no shop. Founded in 1990, The Cellar is one of the oldest communities on the net. Join us at the table if you like!

 
What's IotD?

The interesting, amazing, or mind-boggling images of our days.

IotD Stuff

ARCHIVES - over 13 years of IotD!
About IotD
RSS2
XML

Permalink Latest Image

April 23rd, 2017: Philadelphia Lottery

Recent Images

April 22nd, 2017: The Weed Nuns
Apr 21st, 2017: Cretors' Wagon
Apr 20th, 2017: “World For All”
April 19th, 2017: Automation
Apr 18th, 2017: UFO’s over Los Angeles
Apr 17th, 2017: Feral Chickens
Apr 16th, 2017: Food Forest

The CELLAR Tip Mug
Some folks who have noticed IotD

Neatorama
Worth1000
Mental Floss
Boing Boing
Switched
W3streams
GruntDoc's Blog
No Quarters
Making Light
darrenbarefoot.com
GromBlog
b3ta
Church of the Whale Penis
UniqueDaily.com
Sailor Coruscant
Projectionist

Link to us and we will try to find you after many months!

Common image haunts

Astro Pic of the Day
Earth Sci Pic of the Day
We Make Money Not Art
Spluch
ochevidec.net
Strange New Products
Geisha Asobi Blog
Cute animals blog (in Russian)
20minutos.es
Yahoo Most Emailed

Please avoid copyrighted images (or get permission) when posting!

Advertising

Philadelphia Pawn Shop
The best real estate agent in Montgomery County
The best T.38 Fax provider
Epps Beverages and Beer, Limerick, PA
Sal's Pizza, Elkins Park
Burholme Auto Body, Philadelphia
Coles Tobacco, Pottstown
ERM Auto Service, Glenside
Glenside Collision
Moorehead Catering, Trappe
Salon 153, Bala
Dominicks Auto Body, Phoenixville

   Undertoad  Friday Oct 1 10:28 AM

10/1/2004: Newly-hatched penguin



Born without its tuxedo, a newly hatched king penguin is nursed by zookeeper Mette Larsen of Denmark's Odense Zoo. The baby was placed in an incubator borrowed from the maternity ward of the local university hospital.



FloridaDragon  Friday Oct 1 11:36 AM

that sure looks like it came from the Aliens movie to me....

thought most baby animals were cute so their parents won't kill them...



garnet  Friday Oct 1 11:41 AM

That is NOT what I expected a baby penguin to look like! He really does have an "alien" look to him. Oh well, they sure are cute when they grow up--hopefully it won't take this little guy long to grow out of the funny-looking stage....



Cyber Wolf  Friday Oct 1 12:49 PM

Wow that thing's ugly as sin, but just think of the smooth, smart, sharp tuxedo he'll grow into! Just give him some time.



xoxoxoBruce  Friday Oct 1 03:44 PM

Jurassic Park?



capnhowdy  Friday Oct 1 05:46 PM

Damn. Now that IS ugly! A few facts about these creatures: Prehistoric penguins stood 6 feet tall & weighed about 200 lbs. They could fly as well as any other sea bird. Now they swim at speeds in excess of 25 mph. They can leap up to 6 feet out of the water onto shore. They bite savagely when threatened. A near opposite of humans in this respect: In the Emporer genera ( Aptenodytes forsteri ), The female lays ome egg, then leaves to feed. The male incubates the egg by himself at temperatures as cold as -40 degrees F. By the time the egg has hatched he has lost a third of his body weight. Only after the chick is hatched & stable does the female return. Then Papa Penguin can rest and eat. That's all I got to say about that.......



mmmmbacon  Friday Oct 1 07:10 PM

I find it almost impossible to believe that a bird 6 ft tall, weighing 200 lbs, would be able to get airborne, much less 'fly as well as any sea bird'. Do you have a reference to back that up?



capnhowdy  Friday Oct 1 10:37 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by mmmmbacon
I find it almost impossible to believe that a bird 6 ft tall, weighing 200 lbs, would be able to get airborne, much less 'fly as well as any sea bird'. Do you have a reference to back that up?
Sure do. Excerpted from Compton's Interactive Encyclopedia Copyright(c) 1994, 1995 Compton's Newmedia, Inc. My other cpu has this program living in it. It's a fountain of "useless information". Bear in mind: there were other airborne dinos much larger. Hard to imagine.........the key word here is prehistoric.


mmmmbacon  Saturday Oct 2 03:08 AM

I have to say that despite you providing an official-enough source, I still can't believe it. Look at the physics of it. You know how much power is required to lift a 200 pound body? Considering most of that power would be supplied by the air, it would need enormous wings (with enormous muscles and bones to hold them), and a high enough airspeed to prevent 'stalling' (i.e., falling) - pilots know what I'm talking about.

An albatross weighs only 25 lbs (yeah, only), and it constantly cruises on the wing. I wasn't able to discover how fast they go when they're cruising. One clue however is that (according to
this encyclopedia ) "In the days of sail it often accompanied a ship for days, not merely following it, but wheeling in wide circles around it..." If it needed to maintain a high airspeed, it would have to wheel around in wide circles if it wanted to follow the ship for whatever reason.

A 25lb albatross is about 4 ft long, with a wingspan of 11.5 ft (ibid). To scale a hypothetical bird to be as heavy as 200 lbs, the body length would double to 8ft (close enough to 6ft tall), but the wingspan would also double to 23 ft long. Even if we're overshooting that a lot, you'd think they would mention in the encyclopedia article that a flying penguin that large had an enormous wingspan of, say, almost 20 ft long. You'd think those would be the easy bones to find, right? Is it me - am I the only one who hasn't heard about pre-historic penguins with the massive wings?

Also, you know the saying, "the bigger they are, the harder they fall"? It's hard to imagine how a 200lb bird could land without hurting itself due to the high airspeed the bird would *have* to achieve, even while landing. The article above describes albatross landings as "semi-controlled crashes"... and they're only 25 pounds. Finally, there's a reason turkeys and ostriches and large penguins don't fly. It's because flight doesn't scale well.

Anyway, here's a test: does the encyclopedia article mention the massive wings on these prehistoric penguins? If it doesn't, I gotta call bullshit on either you or the encyclopedia.



404Error  Saturday Oct 2 04:54 AM

Quote:
Finally, there's a reason turkeys and ostriches and large penguins don't fly.

Uh, turkeys do fly, albeit not the most graceful of flying birds but they do in fact fly.


Cyber Wolf  Saturday Oct 2 12:13 PM

Is there anything in that Encyc. that says whether or not the bones of the prehistoric penguin were hollow or not? Or what kind of area they may have lived in?

I know today's penguins have solid bones, but if they figured the thing flew, then its bones would have been either really slender or hollow and full of air pockets, like terrestrial birds' bones. If it did have slender or hollow bones, then most of that 200lbs would have been muscle and with that much muscle, most of it likely in the torso and chest, flight may have been possible. Maybe it couldn't lift off like a sparrow can, but had to take a running start like an albatross or prefered to dive off a cliff like other birds that tend to live near cliffs. With that kind of body, I don't see why it couldn't fly in a controlled glide like a seagull using seawind and thermals to keep aloft.

As far as wingspan goes, how does it compare to the wingspan of a typical hangglider to keep a solidboned 150-200 pound human plus equipment aloft and in control?

If the prehistoric penguins did live around cliffs, then landings would have been pretty easy. Ever see a bird curve in an upward motion during flight to light on the edge of a roof or tree branch. A bird that size could use the lift that comes from an ocean breeze to light perfectly on the edge of a cliff without needing a runway and just waddle off to wherever it needed to be. Of course, this assumes they lived in the similar areas as they do now and had cliffs to use.

Quote:
Originally Posted by mmmmbacon
Also, you know the saying, "the bigger they are, the harder they fall"? It's hard to imagine how a 200lb bird could land without hurting itself due to the high airspeed the bird would *have* to achieve, even while landing. The article above describes albatross landings as "semi-controlled crashes"... and they're only 25 pounds. Finally, there's a reason turkeys and ostriches and large penguins don't fly. It's because flight doesn't scale well.
I'd figure if a critter evolved into the role, then it would be well suited to so controlled crash-landings that much weight, maybe extra skin and fat padding on the belly and chest for cushioning, stronger legs perhaps, better control over its wings than we're giving it credit for...who knows.

Here's a link with more details about prehistoric penguins. This site says up to 300 pounds. It doesn't really appear to touch on whether or not they might have flown. I did find a couple of pages that said that the penguins of old lost their ability to fly around 100 million years ago when climates changed but neither site looked 'official'. I could still post them for the curious.


capnhowdy  Saturday Oct 2 03:16 PM

I didn't find any info about bone density. I do know that they evolved in the Eocene era. They also are not confined to icy regions, but they all live near water. You can find them now in areas near the equator and on the Gallapogas Islands.(spelling?) I wish I knew more about aerodynamics. Kinda like a mix between science and nature. I've seen lots of things fly that made me wonder- "how'd they do that?" Ex: box kites & bumblebees. Maybe I shouldn't have posted that but I think the penguin dilemma is near exhaustion......................



xoxoxoBruce  Saturday Oct 2 09:28 PM

The experts are telling us that dinosaurs evolved into Robins. Why couldn't a flying prehistoric critter evolve into penguins.?



Cane  Saturday Oct 2 11:15 PM

Assuming evolution is still in progress, the penguins are learning to swim faster and jump farther all the time. Do they pass penguin lore down from generation to generation via a surprisingly comprehensive means of communication, such as a complex combination of belches and tap dancing, about grandpaw Opus who flew too close to the sun and got his wings melted?



lumberjim  Saturday Oct 2 11:25 PM

that's nothing compared to the prehistoric snowman. Over 30 feet tall, and it's hat was magic. Your little penguin doesn't seem so impressive now, does it?

don;t make me break out the Triassic Octopi.



wolf  Saturday Oct 2 11:52 PM

Yeah, but could it open a jar?



Elspode  Sunday Oct 3 02:14 PM

Either that is the greatest flying turkey picture of all time, or someone stuck a mounted bird outside on a tree to take the shot. It looks like the label on a bottle of Wild Turkey.

Albatrosses and turkeys both do much more gliding than actual flying. They *can* get airborne from the ground, but they don't like it much. They both take a long, clumsy run to get it accomplished, and neither can really ascend from a standing start by simply flapping their wings, unless they've got a brisk headwind. Albatrosses in particular prefer cliffs where the wind takes an upward course, so they can simply spread their wings and get lifted off of the ground by it.

I once saw a turkey fly over eight lanes of interstate plus the median strip in rush hour traffic at an altitude of about 18-wheeler windshield feet (it was already airborne when I saw it). It flapped its wings about three times across that distance. The landing probably would have been pretty impressive, though, as it was going to occur in a heavily wooded, steeply downsloping piece of terrain.



Elspode  Sunday Oct 3 02:14 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by wolf
Yeah, but could it open a jar?
No, it couldn't. And for the same reason that octopi can't fly.


Trilby  Sunday Oct 3 02:29 PM

Somebody TOTALLY nailed a fake turkey to a tree and took a pic.



404Error  Sunday Oct 3 06:43 PM

Okay, I did a quick google search for 'flying turkey' and that was one of the first pictures I saw that looked good enough to post to make my point. I admit I didn't check it out closely at the time. And you're right, it does look kinda hokey now that I'm looking at it again.



footfootfoot  Sunday Oct 3 09:39 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by Cyber Wolf
... full of air pockets, like terrestrial birds' bones. .
Just wondering, should it be "aerial" birds'? A roadrunner or ostrich, or the late kiwi maybe I'd vote for being terrestrial, but the rest of them? I'm not too sure...


footfootfoot  Sunday Oct 3 09:53 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by Brianna
Somebody TOTALLY nailed a fake turkey to a tree and took a pic.
Quote:
Originally Posted by 404Error
Okay, I did a quick google search for 'flying turkey' and that was one of the first pictures I saw that looked good enough to post to make my point. I admit I didn't check it out closely at the time. And you're right, it does look kinda hokey now that I'm looking at it again.
OK
As a perfessional photogiraffer, I'd stake both your reputations on the veracity of the turkey pic. All flash pictures look fake. especially that one. That one looks especially fake. but it looks so fake that I think it may be real. Then again, it may be frozen. The odd thing is that the head and neck get all red when the bird is excited (my friend had a pet turkey and we'd watch its head go from normal blue to excited red) I doubt it would stay red and excited after the bird was nailed to a tree. Unless of course it was one of "those" kinds of birds, if you get my drift.

Also, we used to live in a place where the turkeys would walk past, and on, our back porch every damn day. 20-30 of them, all ages. Sometimes I'd open the door and startle them. They'd fly helter skelter up into the trees with as much grace as a bulldozer. They'd snap the branches they flew into, bashing anything in their way.

Not twigs, BRANCHES. They are brutes.

A friend of mine worked in a butcher shop during the depression when he was a kid and he told me about the time he had to slaughter a live turkey. He cut off its head and it got away from him IN THE SHOP! The bird flew around for several seconds (must have seemed like a day and a half) covering everyone in the store in blood.

It was the depression, I guess that kind of thing happened w/o lawsuits then.

They fly when they want to.


404Error  Sunday Oct 3 10:56 PM

Foot, good story about the butcher shop! I like your writing style too. Just to clear up the veracity of the turkey picture in question I redid the google search and found the same picture. Low and behold it came from a taxidermy website that had this picture right next to it. This one clearly shows that it is in fact a 'stuffed' turkey nailed to a tree!

Good eye, Bri!

*and we now return you to our regularly scheduled thread topic...



Cyber Wolf  Sunday Oct 3 11:13 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by footfootfoot
Just wondering, should it be "aerial" birds'? A roadrunner or ostrich, or the late kiwi maybe I'd vote for being terrestrial, but the rest of them? I'm not too sure...
I actually borrowed that term from one of the sites I visited. It was used to describe birds that tend to live over/on land and don't have a need to be able to dive, hunt and generally travel via water. So by that token I guess the ostrich would be as terrestrial as the eagle.


Elspode  Monday Oct 4 12:30 AM

I suspected the turkey was stuffed. And now that I look closely at the pic, you can see the board it is mounted to actually nailed to the tree...



Cyber Wolf  Monday Oct 4 07:12 AM

Found a live one on turkeys...

Quote:
CAN WILD TURKEYS FLY?

Wild turkeys can and do fly. Although these birds may sometimes weigh over 25 pounds, their strong muscles and wings allow them powerful flight over short distances. However, adults rarely fly with continuous wingbeats for more than about 1/8 mile. When gliding with periodic wingbeats-- such as flying downslope-- turkeys can fly about 1 mile without difficulty. Their flight speed has been estimated as up to 55 to 60 mph. By nature, however, turkeys are "cursorial" (running) birds and they prefer to move about and escape on foot except when startled or severely chased.

The young poults learn to fly at about 8 to 10 days. At that time, they begin to roost with the hen in trees. Before attaining "flight status", the hen and poults stay together on the ground at night. This may make them more susceptible to predators.

Turkeys do not migrate or fly south for the winter. Although they may use somewhat different habitats or areas at different seasons of the year, Eastern wild turkeys generally stay with a radius of a few miles over the year's time. The Rio Grande and Merriam's turkeys may use a somewhat larger area.



Trilby  Monday Oct 4 10:56 AM

[quote=404Error]
Good eye, Bri! [quote]

Of course I have a good eye! i love your pictures (and, you know I do!) Esp. the froggy-bottom ones.



Elspode  Monday Oct 4 01:12 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by Cyber Wolf
55-60 mph? Criminey...these aren't birds, they're frigging ballistic missiles!


capnhowdy  Monday Oct 4 07:27 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by Elspode
55-60 mph? Criminey...these aren't birds, they're frigging ballistic missiles!
I've seen turkeys go faster than that. Georgia turkeys of course. At my mom's dinner table around the end of November. Lubricated with cranberry sauce. NOT the gelled type. They seem to lose velocity with that kind...........


footfootfoot  Monday Oct 4 08:38 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by 404Error
Foot, good story about the butcher shop! I like your writing style too. Just to clear up the veracity of the turkey picture in question I redid the google search and found the same picture. Low and behold it came from a taxidermy website that had this picture right next to it. This one clearly shows that it is in fact a 'stuffed' turkey nailed to a tree!
Thanks 404,
I just need to add this (monty python):

...Owner: The Norwegian Blue prefers kippin' on it's back! Remarkable bird, innit, squire? Lovely plumage!

**** Mr. Praline: Look, I took the liberty of examining that parrot when I got it home, and I discovered the only reason that it had been sitting on its perch in the first place was that it had been NAILED there.

**** (pause)

**** Owner: Well, o'course it was nailed there! If I hadn't nailed that bird down, it would have nuzzled up to those bars, bent 'em apart with its beak, and VOOM! Feeweeweewee!

**** Mr. Praline: "VOOM"?!? Mate, this bird wouldn't "voom" if you put four million volts through it! 'E's bleedin' demised! ...etc.

So, I guess not just Norwegian Blues need to be nailed down.


Elspode  Monday Oct 4 08:46 PM

I lobbied to have one of my bands of the past named 'Nailed to the Perch', but everyone was afraid that no one would get it...

My primary musical associate, who also liked the idea, decided instead to write a song in honor of that skit, though. If I wasn't lazy, I'd type it out.



busterb  Tuesday Oct 5 02:12 AM

Turkeys can fly. Once years ago I was in woods squrrel hunting about daylight, w/hangover. A damn turkey flew down from roost & scared the hell out of me, well almost. But if on ground they perfer to run. IMHA



Your reply here?

The Cellar Image of the Day is just a section of a larger web community: a bunch of interesting folks talking about everything. Add your two cents to IotD by joining the Cellar.