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   Undertoad  Thursday Sep 1 10:18 AM

9/1/2005: NO from satellite before/after





The images above are too large for IotD, and too wide.

I have avoided any disaster shots because none of them told
any more story than we've seen otherwise, until now.
The USGS landsat project offers up
these wild shots of the changes between August 24 and August 30.

via Boing Boing



Hobbs  Thursday Sep 1 11:07 AM

Doesn't look that bad from up here. I don't know what everyone is so upset about.


Actually, in all seriousness, it is a major tragedy. I can't bear to see anymore pics, video, or hear the stories coming out of the South. I got really sad when I found out that one of the best resturants, Pascal's - famous for their bar-ba-que shrimp, is probably submerged as we speak. All I am seeing is pictures from Canal street, anyone know how the French Quarter faired?



LabRat  Thursday Sep 1 11:30 AM

These are the type of shots I like best, for showing the scope of differance. I see lots of areas that were green, but now are blue. Thanks for the pics. Scary.



Ero  Thursday Sep 1 12:18 PM

It is an interesting shot indeed. The differences seem subtle at first but if you take some time looking at the picture you see loads of flooded areas. note the part in the upper left of the photographs, it is completely gone in the second photo. I'm from the Netherlands so the whole disaster is pretty far away from me but I see it on the news all day and it IS indeed a terrible disaster. I wouldn't wish this to happen to anyone.

I'm new here by the way; read loads of posts on the forum and became particularly interested in joining when I saw that the topics discussed here weren't the usual rubbish. So anyways, hello to everyone here.



plthijinx  Thursday Sep 1 01:29 PM

welcome Ero!



BigV  Thursday Sep 1 02:11 PM

Regarding the second picture:

Quote:
This closeup of New Orleans shows the areas of the city that were flooded after levies broke. These areas are shown as darker green. It has been estimated that 80% of New Orleans is underwater with some areas more than 20 feet under. At the time this image was taken, the water was still rising.
Emphasis mine.

Too sad for words now.


Undertoad  Thursday Sep 1 05:12 PM

plthijnx offers up this before/after:


The Associated Press has this clickable-zoomable version which is probably the best of all such items.



capnhowdy  Thursday Sep 1 06:25 PM

I am at a loss of words in reference to my feelings for these poor folks.
Someone said today: "build a city in a big hole and this is what you get".
Disaster doesn't cull anyone. I could be next. A hurricane spawned tornado killed a few folks 20 something miles from here. Mother Nature is cool, but can cop a bad ass attitude at times. I respect that.



xoxoxoBruce  Thursday Sep 1 07:35 PM

Look and learn, boys and girls. When the shit hits the fan, you have to be self sufficient for a month before you can get help from the ponderous agencies that the government commands.
Most people are not prepared for a 24 hour power outage, let alone a tragedy of this magnitude.

Right from the git-go, they were saying things like it would take several days or a week to get the city services (sewer, water, pumps) back to normal. What were these people thinking? Haven't any of them seen the aftermath of a flood?

After you get rid of the water you have to deal with the mud, trash, furniture, rugs, etc. That's assuming the building is structually sound.
Then about a million gallons of bleach because everything's been soaked with sewage and oil. You can't live there while you're doing this either.

Scale this up to an entire city....a week.....try months. But first you have to move the people somewhere else. People that have lost all there possessions and their jobs for the most part. They'll need a hell of a lot more than sandwiches and bottled water......and quickly.



lookout123  Thursday Sep 1 09:55 PM

Quote:
I got really sad when I found out that one of the best resturants, Pascal's - famous for their bar-ba-que shrimp, is probably submerged as we speak.
i got really sad today when i read that Fats Domino is probably submerged. He and his family chose to ride the storm out in their own home and nobody has heard from them since.


cbane  Thursday Sep 1 11:53 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by Hobbs
All I am seeing is pictures from Canal street, anyone know how the French Quarter faired?
I heard on the news the other day that the French Quarter was in better shape than most of the city, because it was the original part of the city, as is thus on higher ground. Google turned up this, which confirms it.

Also, while looking for confirmation, I found that Fats Domino survived.


Happy Monkey  Friday Sep 2 12:46 AM

Quote:
Originally Posted by lookout123
i got really sad today when i read that Fats Domino is probably submerged. He and his family chose to ride the storm out in their own home and nobody has heard from them since.
Good news. He's OK!


Ero  Friday Sep 2 10:17 AM

For what it know; it seems like a REALLY BIG mess in NO... I've never saw an American person with a high function becoming so emotional and say f*ck as much an interview as I saw the New Orleans mayor say today. It certainly shows the mess of the situation.
By the way; i heard that anarchy has affected the area... I saw people plundering, I heard about gangs of rapists ravaging about the place, people shooting at rescue helicopters and even cops who have been looting stores... It is a big mess...

I live miles & miles away but it even makes me emotional... My sympathy is with all of you Americans.



BigV  Friday Sep 2 11:52 AM

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ero
----cut--. It is a big mess...

I live miles & miles away but it even makes me emotional... My sympathy is with all of you Americans.
Yes, yes, it is. It really really is. Thank you for your sympathy.


Vegeta  Friday Sep 2 01:01 PM

Yes, NOLA Mayor Nagin's interview was heartbreaking but very impressive. I have a ton of respect for that guy after that--his righteous anger and lack of sugarcoating.

And thank you to Happy Monkey and cbane for posting the Fats Domino rescue article links. This has been an awful day for me, and not just because of New Orleans (which would be enough), so it helped immensely to have some fucking good news at last.



lawman  Friday Sep 2 02:52 PM

You know what's kinda sad? With the greater loss of life and infrastructure in Indonesia and Thailand in last December's tsunami - we never heard about lootings/rapings/murderings like we are from New Orleans. No wonder aid agencys are holding back until the Nat'l Guard restores order.

I honestly believe that when the troops see someone with a weapon, they should get one warning to drop the weapon and if they don't immediately comply, they get brain ventilated. Start that with lots of people watching to spread the word and the bad guys won't dare come out and play. Then the heavy urban search and rescue teams, the red cross, fema, etc. can get in there and start doing their jobs.

/soapbox.



Vegeta  Friday Sep 2 03:20 PM

That's the key--we never heard about those things. Doesn't mean they didn't happen. And I doubt the amount of attention those things are currently being given in NOLA is proportional to the frequency among the whole population there.

We do need more security forces there for sure--for crowd control if nothing else, which, given the conditions in the Superdome and elsewhere, I'd wager is a bigger problem than "criminals roaming the streets."

So, those troops and supplies Bush promises are on the way between smirking press conferences and photo ops can get there aaaaany day now...



tw  Friday Sep 2 06:24 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by cbane
I heard on the news the other day that the French Quarter was in better shape than most of the city, because it was the original part of the city, as is thus on higher ground.
Large portion of New Orleans are not massively under water. Many parts only have less than a foot of water. Taking a cross section from the Mississippi River (south) to Lake Pontchartrain (north), the Mississippi side is completely dry. Then a fat finger of water going west must be crossed. Then another dry section called Gentilly Ridge. Continuing north towards Lake Pontchartrain, the land drops very low in areas such as the Ninth Ward.

Any land flooded up to the roof should not have future buildings. Remember, global warming means oceans will rise. Why are we consuming so much energy to keep what should be productive marsh land as houses? If New Orleans paid for it, then no one could afford those homes. Too much welfare. Parts of New Orleans should be saved. Other parts should be surrendered to ma nature.

From land elevations, New Orleans probably started as a strip of land along the Mississippi with wide marshes to the north on into Lake Pontchartrain. As the city grew, it would build levees to drain marshes and lakes. Some parts are 10+ feet under sea level. Why?

Not all of New Orleans should be abandoned. But many areas on the north side - especially the Ninth Ward - should be surrendered to marshland. Or converted to Venice Italy type construction. It will not happen. That is too practical and not in the political interest of self serving politicians. Already George Jr is talking about rebuilding where homes should never exist. But the George Jr also knows that global warming does not exist.

Better to spend more of our money building more levees so that new, high income housing dependent on federally subsidized pumps and levees can have a lake front view. That means more Republican supporters.

As the levees become more saturated, then more will break. As noted elsewhere, these levees are not constructed of proper materials. These levees have no solid core as is so common elsewhere. A latest breach appears to be two on the London Canal which means the Lake now has a shorter path to downtown New Orleans parish.

Even George Jr admits that food and water were not being delivered to the Convention Center.
Quote:
from the NY Times of 2 September 2005
"there's an issue right now at the convention center in New Orleans," where thousands of refugees from Hurricane Katrina have been clamoring for food, water and attention as people died around them.
Be patient. It has only been five days without food or water. Help is coming ... just like to those Tsunami victims. It took how many days for George Jr to decide to send help? But everyone is working so haaarrddd. Why does he insult our intelligence with spin?

Notice all those C5As unloading in groups of ten on the tarmac of Louis Armstrong International airports? Oh. Was not possible to take pictures of planes that did not exist. Clearly there was no need for such drastic responses on day one - using an airport that is adjacent to New Orleans and located on dry land. All that is required is government action. Don't worry. It's in the planning phase. Help is coming. Don't do anything drastic such as die. I am demonstrating all due respect for the intelligence and compassion of some leaders.


xoxoxoBruce  Friday Sep 2 06:44 PM

This link is to an excellent Scientific American article (pfd) explaining New Orleans position with cross section illustrations of the city in relation to the lake, river and ocean.
You'll like it....guaranteed.

btw...My boss is in the Air Force Reserve.....He leaves Tuesday for N.O.



lawman  Friday Sep 2 07:14 PM

Bruce - if the rowdies keep shooting up the military/fire department/police... there might be a career advancement in your future!

my bad. hope he's gonna be ok.



xoxoxoBruce  Saturday Sep 3 06:59 PM

He's been in 24 years, I'm sure he stay out of harms way.

No promotion, I wouldn't last a week as boss.
They have to do what they're are told whereas I prefer to do what's right.



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